Music Parent Guide 2021

Parent Information




Parent Information

Booklet Music Subject Lead: Miss Haycock

Parent Information

At the heart of music, we aim to ignite a passion for this

subject which allows children to develop themselves creatively. Whether this is through performing, composing or appraising, children are provided with an introduction to the essential musical knowledge and skills to appreciate a wide range of music. Within music, all children have the opportunity for individual, group and collective performances. Here is just a taste of some of the musical experiences your child will have in school. In addition to music taught through our topics, the children engage in a whole host of musical experiences here at St Pius X, from weekly singing practice to extra-curricular musical opportunities.

At the heart of music, we aim to ignite a passion for this

Year 1

In Year 1 children talk about nursery rhymes they know and learn that most nursery rhymes are traditional songs that were composed many years ago and were written about events that happened in the past. The children listen carefully to London’s Burning and explain what event the song might be referring to. They sing the song as a group, and are encouraged to sing the words clearly and finish the lines together. The children in Year 1 also listen to a selection of National Anthems and answer the questions: How does listening to this music make you feel? Is it happy, sad, loud or exciting? Does it make you want to dance, stand tall, march or salute? What kind of instruments can you hear playing? Do you think this piece of music is old or modern?

Year 1

Year 2

In Year 2 the children have the opportunity to listen to a drumming ensemble in school and tune into the stirring sounds and beats. The children learn the difference between pulse, rhythm and perfect pitch. They listen carefully to explore how different rhythmic patterns are created and developed. They use their voices to make unusual and differently pitched sounds. They practise humming, yodelling and chanting, increasing and decreasing the volume, lengthening and shortening notes and pitching them high or low. The children explore their voices as instruments, trying out effects and practising in pairs and small groups. The Children explore volume and pitch and compare how different pieces of music make them feel. They can then choose and describe their favourite piece. In the Wriggle and Crawl topic the children add tuned and percussion sounds to a class poem for dramatic effect. They discuss appropriate instruments that could be used for representing different minibeasts. Children learn the origin and structure of sea shanties. They sign along using actions in time to the music. The children learn the shanties through listening and repetition. The children also write new verses to the tunes they have learnt.

Year 2

In Key Stage 2 pupils are taught to sing and play musically with increasing

confidence and control. They develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from aural memory. Year 3 In the Rocks, Relics and Rumbles topic, discuss the instruments that could be used to create their own earthquake soundscape and the sorts of sounds they could create, such as rumbling, rubble falling and crashing. They then work together to develop a graphic score adding the instruments they have created. Children use old pots, pans, metal dustbins and their lids, pipes and metal sheets and create their own steel band. They listen to all the different sounds which can be produced using the metal objects and compose and perform a theatrical steel music extravaganza. Year 4

In Key Stage 2 pupils are taught to sing and play musically with increasing

In Year 4 children write a funny song about bodily functions using the tune Pop

Goes the Weasel, and fit new lyrics to the rhythm and tune. After writing their song, they practise singing along and suggest sound effects to add to the fun. The children listen to the nursery rhyme, When Good King Arthur Ruled This Land. They practise the tune and sing it as a whole class, using their voices expressively. They work in small groups to draft their own verses, using the same syllabic pattern as the original rhyme. They then perform their verses to the class using expression and intonation. The children think carefully about the volume and tone of their voices. The Year 4 children get the opportunity to see a live musical performance. The children focus on the sounds that the performers make with their instruments and voices. Then they take a closer look at how the musicians, instruments and voices complement each other. Year 5 In the topic Stargazers, the children listen to popular songs about space. They learn Rocket Man by Elton John and Space Oddity by David Bowie, and analyse

In Year 4 children write a funny song about bodily functions using the tune Pop

the lyrics of these songs to discover the stories

that are being told. They answer questions such as, what are the common themes running through both songs? How are they reflective of the time they were written? What do you think the artist was saying about the Space Race? The children use music software GarageBand to create magical sounds that they might hear as they enter Alchemy Island. They bring the sounds together to perform a 30 second soundtrack that represents them transporting through their portal to the island. Children experiment with their singing so they can understand the difference between a round and in harmony. A harmony is when singers sing the same words at the same time but different pitched notes. Singing in rounds is when the same melody is sung but at different times in a group. Year 6 In Year 6 the children get the opportunity to take part in a Victorian parlour evening, listening to and singing or humming along with popular tunes of the day. They discuss what instruments they can hear and what moods the different pieces create.

the lyrics of these songs to discover the stories

Children listen to different examples of Maya music. They compare the

different pieces and describe the sounds that they hear. They choose a favourite piece and describe the emotions that it provokes. They then create glyphs to symbolise its instruments and sounds and use their glyphs to map the piece of music and try to recreate it with instruments and their voice. The children explore a range of instruments that use wind to create a sound, including flutes, pipes, whistles and ocarinas. They investigate how the instruments are designed to make sounds and discuss what features they have in common. They watch a musician play a wind instrument and ask questions about how they make different sounds.

Children listen to different examples of Maya music. They compare the



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