EDP Annual Report 2021

Annual Report and Financial Statements




Annual Report and Financial Statements

For the year ending 31st March 2021 Company number 02145656 1

Annual Report and Financial Statements

Table of Contents

Introduction from Chair 3 Welcome 4 Introduction 5 Approach & Values 6 Service Report - Dorset Prisons 8 Service Report - Devon Prisons 9 Case Study - Naloxone 10 Service Report - Family Work 11 Service Report - Together 12 Service Report - Reach 13 Service Report - Co-production and Volunteering 14 Project Report - Flourish in Nature 15 Project Report - The Departure Lounge 16 Plans and Objectives 18 Reference & Administrative Information 19 Structure, Governance and Management 21 Financial review 23 Trustees Report 26 Statement of Financial Activities 31 2

Table of Contents

This has been a year of change and challenge in so many ways with Covid leading the charge! The Pandemic has also

inspired lots of positive change in the ways that we work, how we support our beneficiaries and how we manage our workforce and services. The year has been our first as a subsidiary of Humankind and as an organisation there have been great benefits as we became part of a new structure and new ways of working. This has led to EDP Trustees and Colleagues becoming involved in the dynamic and vibrant system of some additional Specialist Sub Committees. We were delighted to welcome Humankind Colleagues onto our own Board of Trustees, all of whom bring such a wide variety of expertise in substance misuse and in vital operational skills. I would like to express mine and the Board’s thanks to James Hutchinson, Morgen Witzel and Tony Woodward who gave outstanding service on our Board of Trustees and who stepped down when we transitioned to our new structure. I would also like to thank Rick Weeks who recently retired as a Trustee after many years on our Board and who brought much experience and good advice. It became apparent very early on how important our new relationship with Humankind would be as we guided our staff in new ways of working through COVID and vital new procedures and policies that enabled safe and secure working practices. Being part of a larger collective team of experts has enabled us to respond at speed and lay firm foundations for a strong and robust service offer. do, so it has been particularly pleasing to see how our co-production work has developed and expanded. Volunteers are now routinely part of the recruitment process, they work on strategy and service improvements, they help as front line communicators and they give back their lived experience in groups and forums to help others who are starting out on their journey of recovery. The Board have been impressed by many of the Roadshows that EDP and Humankind have run to keep staff abreast of developments and to ensure a vibrant team spirit continues to flourish. It has given us great pleasure to be involved in writing to staff to thank them for their efforts as part of the EDP Heroes programme which is a peer to peer means of recognising everyday successes and achievements. There is no better feeling than knowing that we are contributing to keeping staff morale high and recognising the excellent hard work our staff undertake every day. Seeing all the case studies and feedback from people who are going through or have completed their time with us here in service, brings us the greatest pleasure. Our Charity has never been in better heart and we are proud to present this year’s Annual Report. “ “ Chair’s Introduction Ian MacQueen Chair of Board of Trustees We are passionate about putting our beneficiaries at the very heart of all we 3

This has been a year of change and challenge in so many ways with Covid leading the charge! The Pandemic has also

Welcome

In this, our first full year of subsidiary merger, we developed strong relationships with our colleagues at Humankind, built integrated teams and shared expertise. Working collaboratively, Humankind offered us tremendous support that allowed us to adopt robust new policies and procedures at speed when the pandemic struck. This work continues in what has already been shown to be a very positive relationship. To support those who use our services, we quickly moved to a blended approach of consultations and meetings via zoom, telephone and text. Although of course we appreciate that many people have missed face to face support, it was both encouraging and heartening to discover that many others found the remote and digital support available more accessible, more flexible and easier to fit in around their day to day life. This was reflected in our ‘Did Not Attend’ rate which reduced by almost 70%. Whilst a testing and difficult time for many, some wonderful initiatives came out of the pandemic – a partnership with Dorset County Council delivery drivers to drop off medications direct to people’s doors, home learning and essential sanitary care packs to support our vulnerable families to name 4 but a few. It was particularly challenging for our prisons teams who were constrained by local safety regimes, but who did a fantastic job supporting men to get the vital help, support and advice that they needed. Despite all these challenges, our services have continued to develop and innovate. Our volunteer work has gone from strength to strength, as we built our ‘Working Better Together’ strategy and implemented action groups to examine all aspects of our services and make recommendations for improvement. Just a few of the changes brought in by these groups are the gifting of free phones to our most vulnerable and isolated service users allowing them to access vital services. Service user newsletters to keep people informed of development and opportunities within the service and the involvement of service users in the recruitment process to ensure that new staff fit our values and ethos. We also saw an acceleration of joint working through the Devon Together Alliance, a local partnership of housing, domestic abuse, mental health and other complex care organisations. Following a successful Lottery bid a new digital support service, Plug In Devon, was born which has supported people throughout the pandemic. Having been on a Flourish in Nature walk I have had a glimpse of just how much people are benefiting from this tremendous initiative during lockdown. Thankfully, many of the outdoor activities were able to run and our service users benefited from walks, kayaks, bike rides, tai chi and wild swimming. I am confident that this initiative will go from strength to strength and I look forward to witnessing recovery in action in the outdoor spaces around us. Penny Blackmore CEO “ “ 2020/21 has been like no other year and I am immensely proud of the way that everybody within EDP stepped up to find ways of continuing to deliver our services both in the prisons and in the community. In a year of turmoil and uncertainty, EDP, like so many other vital front line services, needed to understand very quickly, how we could adapt to deliver substance misuse services differently, safely and in ways that continued to be accessible for our service users. So many examples of good practice emerged and indeed both our Devon and Dorset services were commended by our commissioners for adapting so successfully around COVID.

Welcome

Introduction

2020/21 has been a year like no other. EDP’s workforce and service users learned how to communicate differently in order to deliver safe and effective services to a growing number of clients. Being part of Humankind brought many benefits, enabling EDP to respond quickly to the many changes of the COVID landscape. In 2021, EDP is proud to have helped: 7 4 3 1 new people to begin their journey of recovery 5

Introduction

Approach and Values

About EDP Our vision is simple ‘To improve the quality of life for people affected by substance misuse’. What this means in practice is that staff, stakeholders and partners are positive about people and their recovery. We want more people to live fulfilling lives which means improving social connections, wellbeing and employability. We build on peoples’ strengths, on their hopes, aspirations and hidden talents. EDP has a positive history of working with people with drug and alcohol issues. Increasingly we work with people with a range of challenges which impact on their wellbeing. At EDP we • • • • Go the extra mile Stick with people Take a positive approach to risk Do what we say • Focus on what’s strong, not what’s wrong • Work with people to make changes that will last • Work ‘with’ rather than ‘for’ people • Recognise the value of lived experience Values EDP’s values sit at the heart of our work. We recruit, deliver and monitor against our core values and we strive to live by them every day. It was because our values so closely align with those of Humankind that we eventually decided to merge our two organisations, so we will keep delivering and measuring our success against these four core pillars. Belief - We believe people can make it We firmly believe in everyone’s potential. We know that people can and do make remarkable changes Respect - How we work is as important as what we do We will treat everyone respectfully – whether they use our services, work for us or work with us. We are creative, curious and flexible. Partners - We do it together We see partnerships as the key to better futures for people affected by substance misuse. We develop strong and meaningful partnerships with people who use our services, staff, other agencies, our funders, research bodies and our communities. We will ensure that our services are accessible to all. Ambition - We focus on recovery and outcomes We want a world where people are no longer blamed for their substance misuse, no longer socially excluded and are given support to take ownership of and rebuild their lives. We will call for more understanding, more compassion and more resources to make this happen. 6- We will support staff and service users to keep learning and to set and achieve ambitious targets.

Approach and Values

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service report

Dorset prisons HMP Portland: Kevin is 30 with a history of addiction to alcohol and drug use beginning when he was just 10 years old when he was given amphetamines by his mother’s partner. From a young age he progressed on to ecstasy, cocaine and cannabis. Every time he was released from prison and was sent to an AP (“Approved Premises”) he was unable to remain sober. The atmosphere of using and drinking at an AP was his downfall and Kevin kept relapsing. When one of EDP’s recovery workers began working with Kevin it became apparent that he had begun to make changes in his life already. He had been going to AA meetings in the community and had a sponsor with who he had begun to work the 12 steps. Sadly this wasn’t enough and he relapsed on alcohol once again and re-offended returning him to prison. Prior to his relapse he had been working as a painter and decorator and found the weekends particularly difficult which is when his drinking increased. The recovery worker built a plan around his ‘down time’ ensuring actionable goals around his hobbies (fishing), passing his driving test, renewing his relationship with his family, and continuing to go to AA meetings. The recovery worker also brought up the possibility of him going to a rehab on release which is 12 step based which also has group and individual counselling and AA and NA meetings. He showed a keen interest in this possibility quoting how he always relapses on release because of the housing situation and the temptations that arise when he is released into this difficult and toxic environment. Kevin could see how this would help him put into practice the tools and coping skills which we had been discussing in our sessions in a safer environment. I also lent him an AA big blue book and a green and Gold 12 step working guide from our Integrated Substance Misuse Service (ISMS), AA and NA Fellowship library. His motivation to make the changes in his own life was so strong that I asked him to become a wing rep for our ISMS team, so that he could inspire others towards the changes that he was already making himself. Kevin did this with great enthusiasm. Kevin was eventually released straight to the rehab. He has kept in touch. Sharing his life story in front of all the others in the house, was the first breakthrough, then his first ever 9 week period of sobriety and he asked his recovery worker to his graduation ceremony at twelve weeks. 1263 new people receiving treatment (over 3 per day) 701 people successfully completed (2 per day) 9 Mutual Aid Groups 53 structured groups delivered 704 collaborative meetings held with partners (nearly 2 per day) 15 Mentors 8

service report

service report

Devon prisons HMP Channings Wood: Mr A was referred to the prison counsellor by his ISMS keyworker to complete some work around maintaining relationships, because these had always failed due to his substance use. Mr A and the counsellor opened care plan objectives to focus on recognising the negative relationships that would lead him to relapse being able to verbalise what he would like from any of his relationships, including being able to let go of negative people. They worked at understanding how to treat people around him and how to be treated in return, recognising those relationships that would need to be repaired and how to start to repair these. The counsellor worked with Mr A throughout his sentence, helping him to understand his relationships and how they could help his recovery, meeting on a weekly basis, exploring his support networks and who best to keep in his life and those people that were negative for him. A big thing for Mr A had been his relationships with his family, friends and people he would come across - they had always been focused on heroin and always ended badly. The counsellor looked at what Mr A was finding relationships for, what he wanted from them and what he felt he could offer them. They worked hard together on his own identity and self-belief and being a positive factor in any relationship he made. Mr A was released in April 2019 with the plan to maintain the positive relationships he held before custody, how to get back in contact with them and what to say and to remove those relationships that would draw him back into using. In March 2021, I heard someone call my name across the street and Mr A came running over to me. He wanted to thank me greatly for all the work that I had done with him and for believing in him. He said that he had stayed away from “users” and proudly told me that he had been clean since he left prison. He was still with his girlfriend and they were expecting their 1st baby! 1995 new people receiving treatment 1422 people successfully completed 11495 1:1’s completed 1469 collaborative meetings with partners 93 mutual aid groups delivered 686 structured groups delivered 568 collaborative meetings held with partners (11 per week) 9

service report



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