Man's World #2

MAGELLAN, THE LUSIAD




MAGELLAN, THE LUSIAD

The great Age of Reconnaissance CLASSIC NAUTICAL STYLE The uniform of the Aristocrats of the Sea NEW MOTORING SECTION Ross Erickson on the patriarchy Striking back at Leviathan Florida leads the way Combat as Inner Experience DOONVORCANNON Zero HP Lovecraft returns A new first translation

MAGELLAN, THE LUSIAD


'Man cannot remake himself without

suffering, for he is both the marble and the sculptor' Alexis Carrel


MAN'S WORLD

Raw Egg Nationalist (@babygravy9) welcomes you to the sophomore issue of Man's World, the only men's magazine worth reading today. Welcome back, friends, to Man’s World and Raw Egg Journal, the only men’s magazine worth reading. And what a ride it’s been so far! Even I was surprised by the success of the first issue, which was read 25,000 times in the space of a few days, and is past 50,000 views at the time of writing. There’s now an SFW version of the magazine available to read via my Linktree (linktr.ee/raweggnationalist), for those of you who didn’t like the vintage centrefolds. (More on those centrefolds in just a moment.) Whatever doubts I had about the validity of the enterprise, all those weeks ago when I first memed myself into creating it, have now well and truly disappeared. Thank you all for your support and contributions. I’ve done my very best to incorporate the constructive criticism of my anon friends, while remaining aloof from the inevitable sour-grape doo-doo slinging of professional cope artists like… well, why sully this fine publication with their names? You're probably familiar with who I mean. And if not – lucky you! Keep it that way. As I was saying, I’ve done my best to incorporate your legitimate criticism of the typesetting and formatting and also of some of the content, namely the centrefolds. On the first point, I can only beg indulgence on account of my inexperience. I’m still learning, but I’m learning fast. I promised that this issue would be ‘lean, mean and clean’, and I hope you find it so. You won’t have to strain your eyes to see any text, nor should any of the colour schemes prove garish or the transition between them quite so much of a psychedelic experience. I’ll say it again: lean, mean and clean. On the second point, I’ve made the executive decision not to continue the centrefold section, at least in this issue. My intention with the centrefolds was to evoke a time before the advent of readily available internet pornography, with its stringent pubic topiary regime, a time which has quite significant nostalgic value for me. Know ye this: my intention was not at all to provide fodder for your inner Coomer. Far from it. I do understand though, despite the fond personal memories such images have for me, that softcore pornography really was the thin end of the wedge, as it were, for the ubiquitous filth that is doing such harm to the minds and bodies of men, women and children everywhere. Having said that, I would like to issue a plea. As I said in a recent interview, prudery and puritanism will do us much more harm than good. Attempts to enforce a right-wing sharia will only lead to infighting and purity spirals of the kind that continue to prove so destructive for emerging movements. What we have in common is of far greater importance than our stance on a few naked bodies in a magazine, and you shouldn't forget that. So what’s in store for you in this issue? Well, the broad theme of this issue, if you hadn’t guessed from our cover star, a well-developed member of Her Majesty’s Royal Navy – I believe he occupies the rank of rear admiral – is the sea. The sea, the sea! That famous phrase uttered by Xenophon’s wandering Greeks when they finally caught sight of the Black Sea and the outposts of their own civilisation. Our sea-themed special occupies centre-stage and contains a myriad of fantastic articles, from politics to archaeology, history to style, and literature. Learn about the ancient seafaring exploits of our ancestors, the voyages of da Gama and Magellan, and how to dress like a true prep; wonder at modern-day myths by Doonvorcannon and Zero HP Lovecraft; let Elias Kingston tell you how a revival among the states, following the example of maritime Florida, could finally help to slay the dreadful Leviathan of the deep state. And that’s not all of the sea special, let alone the rest of the magazine! Phew! What else? A fantastic new motoring section, for one thing (I keep my promises). A neck and jaw training special, with guest articles from Greco Gum and Herculean Strength. A short comedy sketch from Neon Bag. Eternal Physique returns, and there’s the second part of the serialisation of my book, Three Lives of Golden Age Bodybuilders. Part one of a fantastic defence of the reputation of a true lion of the British Empire; a comparison of two famous responses to the ugliness of modern-day leftism; a short story from Faisal Marzipan; spotlights on new books by Antelope Hill and Imperium Press; an early short story by Pierre Drieu La Rochelle. Dr Chaim Breisacher returns with the second chapter of his fantastic translation of Ernst Jünger’s Combat as Inner Experience. Oh, and don’t let me forget – there’s also an article by the irrepressible and inimitable BRONZE AGE PERVERT. So welcome to Man’s World Issue 2: it's a pleasure to have you back. Issue 2 - The Sea! The Sea!

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MAN'S WORLD

CONTENTS I s s u e 23 2 Chuck Sipes 5 Eternal Physique 10 BAP Ross Erickson 19 67 MOTORING Neon Bag 101 The Company Sabre 104 BAP + Kaczynski 117 Faisal Marzipan 123 111 88 Drieu La Rochelle 125 American Extremist 135 John Cold 138 NECK Cultured Grugs 141 21 THE SEA! THE SEA! JÜNGER Issue 2 - The Sea! The Sea!

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BORN: 22 AUGUST 1932, STERLING ILLINOIS DIED: 24 FEBRUARY 1993, SISKIYOU CO. CALIFORNIA HEIGHT: 5’9” WEIGHT: 220LB 1959 MR AMERICA 1960 MR UNIVERSE 1968 MR WORLD In this second extract from his sophomore book, Three Lives of Golden Age Bodybuilders, Raw Egg Nationalist describes the inspiring, extraordinary life of the man they called... THE IRON KNIGHT CHUCK SIPES Issue 2 - The Sea! The Sea!

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MAN'S WORLD

For a week now they have followed him, climbing further into the mountains. From time to time they stop, and he points out to the young men some species of tree or plant, a bird of prey high above, circling in the cloudless sky – even a mountain lion across the valley beyond. They look at these things, but observe with just as much wonder the enormous musculature of the man’s outstretched arms and shoulders; and when he walks in front of them, the vast spread of his back, the neck that seems to have been transplanted from some mythical creature, and his calves, like two thick joints of ham, above the ankle socks and boots. They have seen men like this before, but never outside the pages of a comic book. In the afternoons, when the sun is less intense, they find a shaded spot, drop their packs and exercise together. When night comes, they sleep soundly under a canopy of stars none of them have ever seen back in the city. Now, in the evenings, after supper, under his guidance their talk moves from the usual chit-chat, jokes and things young men talk about to a more serious topic: how each of them has come to find himself on the wrong side of the law. At first, the young men have trouble opening up. It’s not easy to talk like this. Nobody has ever listened to them before. Their thoughts and feelings have never mattered. But this seems to be his real superpower: he shows them that they do matter. They are not just victims of circumstance, the ever-present criminal element of society, but masters of their own destiny. They have a choice. When they return home in three weeks’ time, each of them will be determined to be a better man – to be just like Chuck Sipes. Coker, and the hard paratrooper’s training, had clearly already provided him with the basis for his later marvellous physique. Chuck now returned to California and normal life (if by ‘normal’ you mean the life of a lumberjack) with the intention of becoming a bodybuilder; and not just any bodybuilder but the best in the world. He sought out Bill Pearl, who won his first Mr Universe competition the next year, in London, beating, among others, a 23-year-old Scot by the name of Sean Connery. Pearl would win the Universe title an unheralded four times before his retirement in 1971, and receive the moniker of the 'World’s Best-built Man of the Century’; he has been described as ‘Arnold, before there was Arnold’, and ‘bodybuilding’s first true crossover superstar’, both of which could also just as equally be applied to Reg Park as well. For Chuck, the mould was set: not only was Pearl possessed of a beautiful physique, but he was also extremely strong. He regularly dressed up in the garb of a Sandow-era strongman – replete with leotard or fig leaf, fake moustache and period backdrop – and performed feats of strength like bending spike nails and blowing up hot water bottles until they exploded; he could also bench press 500lb, at a time when very few men could. Chuck would go on to perform similar feats in similarly absurd getups, bending steel rebars held between his teeth, ripping phonebooks in half with his bare hands or crushing spike nails, just like his mentor. His mentor’s bench press PR he would beat by a full hundred pounds. While Chuck was competing, the only man stronger at benching – in the world – was Pat Casey, who was also 135lb heavier than him. An Illinoisian by birth, Chuck Sipes moved to Modesto, California with his family as a child. Although he had already been introduced to weight training as a scrawny wannabe high-school football player, Chuck had his real introduction to bodybuilding only after a taste of high-speed dirt that would have killed anybody other than a man destined to be a demigod; so too Chet Yorton, whose accident was arguably worse. Before their respective dates with near-death, neither man had displayed much evidence of the physical prowess with which his name would later be synonymous. During his early days as a schoolboy lifter, under the tutelage of his neighbour Chuck Coker, Sipes showed no real interest in bodybuilding at all. Chuck began his competitive bodybuilding career unwillingly. Chuck Coker recalls that when Sipes was a lifting competitor in his junior college days in Modesto, there was one occasion when a physique contest was held in connection with the lifting. Chuck’s buddies on the team filled out an entry form to the physique contest, then informed Chuck that he had to get up on stage and pose. He said no at first, but then did sort of a stroll across the stage and hit a few poses. (This may be the first recorded instance of the Chad stride.) Throughout his bodybuilding career, the posing, rather than the lifting, would remain the part that least interested Chuck, and his lack of a polished posing routine probably cost him a number of titles he would otherwise have won. After graduating from school, Chuck decided to become a paratrooper, joining the US Army’s famous 82nd Airborne. He served for three years until during a practice jump his parachute failed and he became entangled with another trooper, falling 70 feet to the ground. (Some have suggested that the impact may have been the cause of the mysterious and hugely destructive Tunguska Event; however plausible the claim that the earth would come off a distant second to Chuck Sipes in a collision, the disparity of dates and locations is enough to disprove this.) Chuck spent the next four months in hospital, recovering from serious head injuries that would leave their mark in the longer term with epilepsy and severe depression; tragically, the depression would dog him for the rest of his life, and was almost certainly a contributor to his death by suicide, in 1993. But our story continues in 1952. After his time in hospital, Chuck began to receive disability pay for his injuries, until a visit to a military doctor brought those payments to an end: how could a man with a body like that be disabled? The work with Chuck After around five years of training, in 1958 Chuck won his first competition, in California, the Amateur Athletic Union’s Mr North California contest; he was 26. He also placed in the top ten that year in a number of other regional and national contests, including the AAU’s Junior Mr America and Mr America contests. In 1959, Chuck would get his first taste of real success, winning the IFBB Mr America, before winning the 1960 Mr Universe. In the mid-sixties, he turned his attention to the Mr Olympia contest for the first time. In the 1966 Olympia, won by Larry Scott, he placed third, and the following year, he came second to Sergio Oliva; along with Chet Yorton and Frank Zane, Oliva, a Cuban bodybuilder often referred to as ‘the Myth’, was one of only three people ever to beat Arnold in competition. Chuck continued to compete to the end of the decade and into the early seventies. After his close failures at the 1966 and 1967 Olympias, he won the NABBA World Championship in 1967 and Mr California and Mr World in 1968. In 1970, he came second in the medium class of the Mr Universe, whose overall class was won by Arnold. Chuck finally retired from competition in 1974 following his win in the over40s category of the Mr Pacific Coast. The intensity not just of Chuck’s competition training but of his life in general was legendary. Where most would struggle to fit a bodybuilding routine in around any kind of full-time job, Issue 2 - The Sea! The Sea! 6

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Chuck, being Chuck, managed to work out after full days chopping trees as a lumberjack or in sawmills up and down the Pacific Coast. He credited his massive 18” forearms to this hard work, at a time when many bodybuilders did little or no separate forearm training; he considered his forearms to be essential to his massive strength. And it was no mere routine he performed after putting down his chainsaw and hardhat and washing the dirt, sweat and sawdust from his skin. In the runup to the 1968 Mr World, for instance, Chuck was training every body part three days a week, working up to his maximum lifts every other day and using all sorts of high-intensity schemes, such as the 1-10/10-1. As well as lifting heavy often, Sipes believed in maximising intensity, reducing his rest times between sets to as little as ten seconds. Chuck as Sandow This rugged lifestyle, while hardening his muscles superbly, did nothing to harden Chuck’s heart. Said Dave Draper of Chuck: This man, who looked like a pile of rocks and lifted steel like a crane and shredded and crumpled anything he got his hands on, was a gentleman, a peacemaker and an artist. He insisted you go first while he carried your load; he counseled troubled young men in the California state penal system and created with brush and oils on large canvas incredible old west paintings in marvelous detail. Chuck Sipes was a mighty good man. The term ‘muscular Christian’ could have been coined, in the most literal sense, to describe Chuck; and I can think of few who would be better placed to lead a revival of that much maligned and misunderstood doctrine than the Iron Knight himself. Before and after retiring from competitive bodybuilding, he spent 20 years coaching and mentoring troubled inner-city youths for the California Youth Authority. Chuck put his love and knowledge of the California wilderness to good use by leading groups of young men on three-week expeditions into the forest. There, after the initial bewilderment had passed, he would help them to speak about and understand the difficulties of their lives. These campfire conversations became the basis of many lifelong friendships between Chuck and his mentees, who would continue to visit him through the years. The expeditions also involved impromptu workouts in which cables would be wrapped around trees and various exercises were performed. The success rate of Chuck’s work was overwhelming: according to the superintendent of Folsom Prison, 96% of the youths Chuck mentored did not return to jail. Ever humble, Chuck said, heartfelt letter about your high school’s drug problem would almost invariably guarantee an appearance from the man himself, who would turn up, put on an awesome exhibition of strength and then give a stirring speech on the virtues of clean living and exercise. It was drugs, in particular, that led to Chuck’s departure from competitive bodybuilding, in the early 1970s. A few years after Chet Yorton was turned on to the dangers of steroids, Chuck was rooming with another world famous bodybuilder overseas during a posing exhibition. Chuck walked into their hotel room and found the other bodybuilder with a needle in his butt. Chuck asked what was going on and was told, “Oh, you have to do this to compete these days.” Chuck, however, disagreed, and began to speak out against steroid use. ‘CHARLTON HESTON’S MUSCULAR DOUBLE’ featured on the cover of the February 1971 issue of Muscle Training magazine, beside the caption: ‘MR AMERICA CHUCK SIPES SAYS: DRUGS ARE DESTROYING MUSCLE MEN’. Chuck effectively retired from bodybuilding after the article was published; although he competed one final time in 1974. Of course, he continued to train, and remained in amazing shape. Part of his community work involved acting as the weight trainer at a youth facility, and a fellow employee remembers how when Chuck was in his mid-fifties, with grey shoulderlength hair, ‘this O.G. was still cut up, I couldn’t believe someone at this age could continue to stay in shape’. Chuck also continued trekking in the wilderness, which became the subject of another of his hobbies: painting. While it’s hard to find pictures of Chuck’s paintings on the internet, one image can be found of Chuck posing proudly next to a fantastically detailed mountain river scene, with two riders in the foreground. The date of the painting isn’t clear, but Chuck has grey in his beard and his hair is receding; yet the famous physique is still evident – the enormous forearms and biceps, especially. During the later years of Chuck’s life, his mood darkened, and nothing his family and friends could do could change it; life seemed to hold him with a weaker and weaker grip. His painting no longer brought the same satisfaction, and bureaucracy began to get in the way of the expeditions that had done such good for the deprived young men of California. Ultimately, the reason why a man like Chuck Sipes would take his own life – simple brain chemistry or something far less simple – must remain a mystery. Joe Roark, of the Roark Report, puts it well: What causes a man, who cheers up everyone, to change so that he cannot be cheered up by those he loves? Big Chuck was becoming little Chuck inside himself. A man whose family loved him, whose artwork was respected, whose cell-mates (so to speak) became sell-mates and are forever in his debt, whose stupendous strength and physique accomplishments were no longer able to re-kindle his former bright attitudes. Chuck was buried in his buckskins, a mountain man to the last. One of the many young men whose life Chuck had helped to transform read the eulogy. ‘CHUCK SIPES – MEETS THE SUN’, his gravestone reads: back into the light he had shone on all those who knew him. Three Lives of Golden Age Bodybuilders is available now for purchase from Amazon or the Rogue Scholar book store, or for free download via linktr.ee/raweggnationalist. One of my objectives was to win the kids over to Christianity, and introduce them to a more positive way of life. It may not have been the answer for all, but it was a start in the right direction. The use of drugs was one of Chuck’s particular concerns. A Issue 2 - The Sea! The Sea! 8

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