Reading and Phonics

This booklet contains information about how reading and phonics is taught at St.




This booklet contains information about how reading and phonics is taught at St.

Pius X. Within this booklet you will find helpful tips for you as parents and carers to help your child become better readers.

This booklet contains information about how reading and phonics is taught at St.

Included in this booklet:

● What is phonics? o Why teach phonics? o Definitions o Phonics Bug o Phonics Screening ● How to help with phonics at home o Games and Activities to do at home o Some useful websites o Some useful apps ● Reading in school o How do we teach reading at school? o Reception o KS1 o Bug Club o Book Bands o Reading records o Reading at home ● How to help your child with reading at home o Reading Records o What you can do at home o Reading for pleasure o Useful questions for reading times o Reading for pleasure o Useful websites o Useful apps What is Phonics?

Included in this booklet:

Phonics is a way of teaching children to read quickly and skilfully. They are taught

how to: ● recognise the sounds that each individual letter makes; ● identify the sounds that different combinations of letters make- such as ‘sh’ or ‘oo’; and ● blend these sounds together from left to right to make a word. Children can then use this knowledge to ‘de-code’ new words that they hear or see. This is the first important step in learning to read. Why teach phonics? The ability to read and write well is a vital skill for all children, paving the way for an enjoyable and successful school experience. Phonics helps children to develop good reading and spelling skills. For example, cat can be sounded out for reading and spelling. We use the Little Wandle scheme to teach phonics in school. Little Wandle aims to help all children in our school learn to read by the age of six in a fun and accessible way. The scheme follows the order of Letters and Sounds. Phonics consists of: ● Identifying sounds in spoken words ● Recognising the common spellings of each phoneme. ● Blending phonemes into words for reading. ● Segmenting words into phonemes for spelling. Definitions A Phoneme This is the smallest unit of sound in a word

Phonics is a way of teaching children to read quickly and skilfully. They are taught

e.g. In the word cat there are 3 phonemes

A grapheme These are the letters that represent the phoneme. Children need to practise recognising the grapheme and saying the phoneme that it represents The grapheme could be 1 letter, 2 letters or more! We often refer to these as sound buttons: Eg. t ai igh Blending ● Recognising the letter sounds in a written word and blending them to read the word, for example: c–u–p d–o–g Segmenting ● Splitting the word to spell it out ● The opposite to blending ● Identifying the individual sounds in a spoken word e.g. ch- ee- k c- oi – n Digraphs - 2 letters that make 1 sound oa as in boat ai as in train Trigraphs - 3 letters that make 1 sound igh as in night dge as in fudge Tricky words Words that are not phonically decodable e.g. was, the, I Little Wandle

e.g. In the word cat there are 3 phonemes

In school lessons are taught using the Little Wandle scheme following letters and

sounds. Children will be taught daily phonics from Nursery to Year 2. Additional phonics teaching might take place in KS2 for children who require it. ● Letters and Sounds is divided into six phases, with each phase building on the skills and knowledge of previous learning. ● Children have time to practise and rapidly expand their ability to read and spell words. ● Children are also taught to read and spell ‘tricky words’, which are words with spellings that are unusual. Lesson Format In each year group, phonic sessions will follow this format: ● Revise: the children will revise previous learning. ● Teach: new phonemes or high frequency or tricky words will be taught. ● Practice: the children will practise the new learning by reading and/or writing the words. ● Apply: the children will apply their new learning by reading or writing sentences. Phonics Screening

In school lessons are taught using the Little Wandle scheme following letters and

What is the phonics screening check?

At the end of Year 1, your child will take part in a statutory phonics screening check. The phonics screening check is a quick and easy check of your child’s phonics knowledge. It helps school confirm whether your child has made the expected progress. The phonics check will take place in June* Children who don’t pass the phonic screen check will be retested in Year 2. * Children who left Year 1 in Summer 2020 (current Year 2s) will take the phonic screening check in the Autumn Term of 2020. Children who do not pass will retake the screening in June. How to help with phonics at home

What is the phonics screening check?

Games and Activities

Here are some games and activities that you can do at home to promote and help your child in phonics. ● Sing an alphabet song together ● Play ‘I spy’ ● Use magnetic letters to make words (Can you segment the word? Can you blend these sounds?) ● Play pairs with words and pictures ● When out for a walk pick objects and ask your child what sound does it start with? ● Mystery bag - place 3 objects in a bag like a ball, button and book. Have the children feel in the bag and guess the mystery letter ● Monster names - children to create made up monster names ● Treasure hunts - write sounds on pebbles. Children find them and make words Some useful websites ● ● ● ● http://www.letters-and-sounds.com/ https://www.phonicsbloom.com/ https://www.phonicsplay.co.uk/ https://www.topmarks.co.uk/english-games/5-7-years/letters-and-sounds ● https://www.littlewandlelettersandsounds.org.uk/resources/my-letters-an d-sounds/engaging-parents/ ● Some useful apps ● ● ● ● Hooked on Phonics Read with Phonics Teach your Monster to Read ABC Phonics

Games and Activities

Reading in school

Once children have started formal phonic teaching in Reception children begin to learn how to read. How do we teach reading in school? ● Daily phonic sessions (Reception, Year 1 & Year 2) ● Shared reading (adult reads to the child) ● Guided reading (small group reading sessions in Reception Whole class reading sessions in Year 1 & 2) ● Individual reading (children will be listened to read in school) ● Reading for pleasure (children reading a book of their choice) Home Reading Your child’s reading book will be changed once a week by an adult in school. The reason why your child will keep the same reading book each week is to fully emerse themselves in the book and have a sound understanding of the text. The book your child takes home will be matched to their current phonics teaching. We ask that you listen to your child every night engaging with the story with them and asking them questions. Before your child reads a book, ask: Why did you select this book? What makes you think this book is going to be interesting? What do you think the book is going to be about? Does this book remind you of anything else you’ve already read or seen? What kind of characters do you think will be in the book? What do you think is going to happen? While your child is reading a book, try asking: Will you catch me up on the story? What’s happened so far? What do you think will happen next? If you were that character, what would you have done differently in that situation? If the book was a TV show, which actors would you cast in it? Where is the book set? If the main character in that story lived next door, would you be friends?

Reading in school

What does the place look like in your head as you read? Would you want to visit

there? Did you learn any new words or facts so far? After your child has finished a book, ask questions like: What was your favorite part of the book? Why? Who was your favorite character? Why? What was the most interesting thing you learned from the book? Why do you think the author wrote this book? Would you have ended the book differently? Did it end the way you thought it would? Did the problem of the book’s plot get solved? If you could change one thing in the book, what would it be? How to help your child with reading at home? Before they come to school, your child will have begun to explore the world of reading through sharing and exploring books with you. Once they have started to learn the skills required to read for themselves they need to practise frequently. Helping your child to master the lifelong skills of reading and become fluent, independent reader who develops a love for reading is one of the most important ways you can support your child’s learning at home. Reading Records It is essential to your child’s development that they’re reading at home daily. We ask parents to read daily with their children and write a comment in their reading record. These will be checked daily by an adult and used to record individual reading in school as well. What you can do at home ● Find a quiet place away from other interruptions. ● Spend a few minutes discussing the blurb (back of the book) and front cover before you even open the book – What do you think this book is about? ● Help and support your child if they get stuck on any words. DO NOT simply tell them words, encourage them to work it out by: - Sounding out the sounds

What does the place look like in your head as you read? Would you want to visit



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