Oxford Story Phonics Teacher's Guide (Levels 1-6)

The key to success in advancing to primary programmes

Teacher’s Guide  Levels 1-6

Authors
Dr Susan Russak
Dr Richard KS Wong

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Contents
Introduction
From our authors

2

Why, when and how to learn phonics?

3

Overview of Oxford Story Phonics

4

Pedagogy and curriculum development

9

Teaching and learning strategies

14

Useful tips for teachers

18

Content structure (Levels 1-6)

24

Lesson delivery
Key to symbols and other conventions

36

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Letter sounds

38

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Rhymes (blending)

42

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Revision

46

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Reading Fun

49

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Rhymes (blending and segmenting)

51

Lesson flow: Level 5 (Book 5C) – Rhymes (disyllabic words)

56

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Revision

59

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 1

62

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 2

64

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 1 & 3

67

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 2 & 4

69

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 1

72

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 2 & 3

74

Pronunciation points to note

78

Game ideas

82

More chants for practice

91

Appendices

98

3
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1

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

From our authors
Dr Susan Russak is currently the Head of the English Department in the
School of Education at Beit Berl College, Israel. She has many years of
experience training English teachers and teacher mentors. She has two
MA degrees in learning and reading disabilities and a PhD in Linguistics.
She is dedicated to researching literacy acquisition in multilingual
learners of varying abilities and ages. She is co-author of the preschool
phonics series Get Set, Go! Phonics (Oxford University Press), which

Dr Susan Russak

won the British Council’s ELTons Award in the category of Excellence in
Course Innovation in London in 2018.

Oxford Story Phonics is a phonics-based literacy programme grounded in research findings
and best practices relating to children’s language and literacy development. In line with the
latest research, our programme focuses first on building essential oral language and
phonological awareness and then grafts reading and writing skills onto this foundation through
stories, games and chants. Based on class observations, we have also developed child-friendly
strategies for deciphering and spelling words, namely the five steps for reading and the five
steps for writing, to enable children to read with fluency and write with confidence.

Dr Richard KS Wong is an experienced teacher educator specializing in the

Dr Richard KS Wong

education of children aged 0-8. With a strong research interest in language
acquisition, he was formerly Assistant Professor in the Department of Early
Childhood Education at The Education University of Hong Kong and
Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Linguistics and Modern
Languages at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is co-author of the
preschool phonics series Get Set, Go! Phonics (Oxford University Press),
which won the British Council’s ELTons Award in the category of
Excellence in Course Innovation in London in 2018.

To support young learners’ transition from oracy to literacy, Oxford Story Phonics adopts a
balanced literacy approach in which phonics is integrated into the teaching of language skills.
Building on children’s phonological awareness and letter-sound knowledge, we further
develop their orthographic awareness through introducing the six orthographic syllable types
in order to improve their fluency in reading and writing. Besides, our innovative programme
incorporates blended learning elements, enabling teachers to switch with ease between faceto-face classroom settings and online settings for effective lesson delivery.

2

Why, when and how to learn phonics?
Why should children learn phonics in preparation for primary school?
The preschool English curriculum is oriented towards fostering children’s listening and
speaking skills (oracy). The primary English curriculum, on the other hand, extends to
developing children’s reading and writing skills (literacy) as the next step. Phonics is a
literacy instruction approach that systematically teaches the letter-sound relationships,
supporting children’s transition from oracy to literacy. Written words are like a set of alien
codes to children, and phonics equips children with the knowledge and skills that guide them
to crack the codes. With phonics skills, children are able to decode (read) and encode (spell)
the words they encounter confidently and independently.
For example, in the context of primary education, children equipped with phonics skills can
sound out and decipher unfamiliar words from books by converting the letters into sounds and
relating them to the oral vocabulary they already know. Likewise, in dictation tasks, phonics
skills help children to convert the sounds that they hear into letters, a skill that would not be
possible if they were to learn spelling through rote memorization only.
How can children learn phonics effectively?
Effective phonics learning is more than practising blending and segmenting sounds and letters.
It also includes building vocabulary knowledge, phonological awareness and orthographic
awareness.
In the early literacy stage for English as an additional language, children must first learn as
many spoken words as possible. This basis of oral language vocabulary will then enable
children to recognize and make sense of the words they have just read.
Phonological awareness (i.e. the ability to identify and manipulate the sounds within words)
stands at the base of word decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling). Once children have
learnt new vocabulary items, it is advisable for them to develop both phonological awareness
and letter-sound relationships in order to facilitate beginning word reading. Orthographic
awareness (i.e. the ability to recognize letter patterns in the written form of the language)
allows children to identify recurring letter patterns within words with ease. It
further supports reading and writing skills in beginning and advanced readers.
With these language awareness skills, children
Familiarize yourself with these
will become more conscious of sound units and
FAQs and be prepared to
letter patterns, which will pave the way for
explain to parents succinctly!
successful literacy development.

3

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Overview of Oxford Story Phonics
The ultimate goals of the programme
Oxford Story Phonics is a six-level English language programme that aims to equip young
children with the comprehensive range of phonics and literacy skills required for a successful
transition to primary English learning. Through story-based phonics lessons and an array of
reading and writing activities, young children will become capable beginning readers and
writers with growing confidence.

The progression for developing phonics and literacy skills

The six levels focus on
phonics, reading and
writing skills.

Writing refers to activities that range
from penmanship (including correct
letter formation, spacing and
punctuation) to spelling and writing
(copying and composing).

Year 1 focuses on developing phonological awareness,
fundamental phonics skills and early literacy skills.

Year 2 extends to developing orthographic awareness through
orthographic syllable types and incorporates phonics into the
teaching of reading and writing.

Year 3 encompasses more advanced phonics knowledge and
further develops literacy skills for a smooth transition into the
primary school years.

4

Year/Level
Foundation Year 1
(Levels 1-2)

Learning outcomes
Phonics
• count the syllables
• learn 26 letter names, letter sounds and corresponding target words
• learn 11 rhyme families and corresponding target words
• identify onsets and rhymes
• blend onsets and common rhymes to form monosyllabic words
Reading and writing
• develop print awareness
• develop hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills
• trace/write letters as part of a word
• read aloud simple sentences and chants
• read 2 selected Oxford Reading Tree readers (Read with Oxford
Stage 1) under guidance

Foundation Year 2
(Levels 3-4)

Phonics
• learn a total of 20 digraphs (e.g. /sh/) and consonant clusters (e.g. /st/)
and corresponding target words
• learn 24 rhyme families and corresponding target words
• blend onsets and common rhymes to form monosyllabic words
• segment monosyllabic words into onsets and rhymes
Reading and writing
• learn to read using the ‘5 reading steps’
• write simple sentences using the ‘5 writing steps’
• complete funny poems using the target rhymes
• learn common sight words
• read 6 selected Oxford Reading Tree readers (Read with Oxford
Stages 1-3)

Enrichment Year 3
(Levels 5-6)

Phonics
• learn additional 4 consonant clusters and 3 silent consonant letters
and corresponding target words
• learn 15 rhyme families and corresponding target words
• further apply blending and segmenting skills
• blend disyllabic words containing opening syllables and closed
syllables
Reading and writing
• read 10 selected Oxford Reading Tree readers (Read with Oxford
Stages 2-4), including fiction, non-fiction and poetry
• learn the features of a variety of text types
• complete guided writing tasks
• learn basic grammar rules and writing conventions

5

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Teaching and learning resources

Oxford Reading Pen

Talking Reading Fun Worksheets

Talking Sound Cards

Talking Student’s Books 1A-6C

Talking Posters

Word Cards

Follow-along PowerPoint decks

Printable crafts

6

Teacher’s Guide

Placement tests and assessment tests
(with notes to teachers)

List of selected Oxford Reading Tree readers

To learn more about
‘Read with Oxford Stages’
The reading list is subject to change depending on the availability of the selected readers and
feedback from teachers.
Year

Level Student’s Book

Matching ORT reader

Read with
Oxford Stage

Year 1

Songbirds Phonics Level 1+:
The Big Cod

Stage 1

2

Year 2

1

Songbirds Phonics Level 1+:
Bob Bug

Stage 1

3

Traditional Tales Stage 1+:
Get the Rat!

Stage 1

Traditional Tales Stage 1+:
The Big Carrot

Stage 1

Traditional Tales Stage 2:
The King and His Wish

Stage 2

Songbirds Phonics Level 5:
Sue Kangaroo

Stage 3

Floppy Phonics Level 3:
Leek Hotpot

Stage 2

Songbirds Phonics Level 4:
Pirates

Stage 3

4

7

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Year

Level Student’s Book

Matching ORT reader

Read with
Oxford Stage

Year 3

5

Stage 3

Songbirds Phonics Level 4:
The Wrong Kind of Knight

Stage 3

Songbirds Phonics Level 6:
Paula the Vet

Stage 4

Songbirds Phonics Level 4:
My Cat

Stage 3

Explore with Biff, Chip and
Kipper Level 3:
Home for a Night

Stage 2

Biff, Chip and Kipper
Stories Level 5:
A New Classroom

Stage 3

inFact Level 4:
Zoom In!

Stage 2

inFact Level 5:
Can Fish Fly?

Stage 3

I Can Read! Oxford
Poetry For 5 Year Olds:
‘Seasons of Trees’

Stage 4

I Can Read! Oxford

6

Floppy Phonics Stage 4:
Green Planet Kids

Stage 4

Poetry For 5 Year Olds:
‘Pets’
Further reading
More graded readers are available in the free Oxford Owl eBook library. Based on the
types of phonics knowledge and themes introduced in class, teachers can recommend
additional readers to help children to develop a good reading habit from a young age.

8

Oxford Owl
for Home

Pedagogy and curriculum development
1. Fostering phonological awareness in a developmentally appropriate order
Since a key focus of the programme is to develop children’s phonological awareness (PA),
different aspects of PA are introduced in a structured, sequential manner.
Sound recognition

Sound manipulation

Recognize syllables, onsets,
rhymes and phonemes

PA develops from an awareness of
bigger to smaller linguistic units.

Children learn to blend sounds into words before
they break words into sounds.

In consideration of children’s developmental needs, we have devised a systematic scheme as
follows:

9

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

2. Adoption of the onset-rhyme approach
Instead of being introduced to individual letter sounds, children are taught to identify spelling
patterns of whole words and then split them into onsets and rhymes.
Common approach
using individual sounds

Our approach
using onsets and rhymes

The same vowel letter, for example ‘a’, can be
pronounced differently when it occurs in
different positions within a word. When words
are analyzed as individual sounds, the complex
pronunciations of vowel letters can cause
confusion to many young learners of English.

When the vowel and the following letter(s) are
analyzed as a single unit, i.e., a rhyme, the
pronunciation of the vowel letter tends to be more
stable. Our onset-rhyme approach enables
children to deal with tricky English spellings and
decode words more confidently. It is best suited
for children who start learning English at a very
young age.

3. Building vocabulary in context
Without adequate vocabulary knowledge, children are unlikely to make sense of what they
have just read or pronounced. In line with the process for acquiring literacy in their first
language, when learning English, children require a solid oral language foundation,
particularly a wide variety of spoken vocabulary, before they learn phonics. In each unit of
our series, key vocabulary and oral skills are taught using short stories. The key vocabulary
serves as an anchor to help children to remember the target letter patterns and analyze the
letter-sound relationships.

10

4. Introduction of orthographic syllable types to develop orthographic awareness
Once children are able to recognize and manipulate sounds (i.e. phonological awareness), we
guide them to build up orthographic awareness by recognizing frequently occurring letter
patterns that represent specific sound units with the aid of orthographic syllable types.
In the English language, there are six common orthographic syllable types. By learning these
orthographic patterns and their pronunciation rules, children acquire knowledge that will help
them to predict the pronunciation of unfamiliar words. In our programme, we introduce a
range of rhyme families that fall into the following orthographic syllable types.

Type

Level

Example

Definition

Closed

1-5

cap, think

A syllable with a short vowel, spelt
with a single vowel letter ending in
one or more consonants.

VowelConsonant-e
(VCe) (Magic E)

4

line, snake

A syllable with a long vowel, spelt
with one vowel + one consonant +
silent e. The vowel is pronounced the
same as its letter name.

Vowel Team
(including
diphthongs)

4

coat, pie,
joy, stay

Syllables with long or short vowel
spellings that use two to four letters to
spell the vowel. Diphthongs /ay/ and
/oy/ are included in this category.

R-controlled
(Bossy R)

5

car, thorn

A syllable with letter patterns such as
-ar, -er, -ir, -or and -ur. The letter r
changes the pronunciation of the
vowel.

Open

5

basin, robot

A syllable that ends with a long vowel
sound, spelt with a single vowel letter.
The vowel is pronounced the same as
its letter name.

Consonant-le
(C-le)

5

bottle, cuddle

An unaccented final syllable that
contains a consonant before /l/,
followed by a silent e.

11

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

5. Integration of ORT readers for extension and application
In order to examine whether children can apply their phonics knowledge and reading strategies
when reading a new text, we incorporate widely acclaimed Oxford Reading Tree readers in our
programme. A range of ORT readers from Read with Oxford Stages 1-4 have been carefully
chosen to match the target words (e.g. claw) and target rhyme families (e.g. snip) introduced at
different levels. For enhanced learning outcomes, graded exercises are also provided in
Student’s Books and Reading Fun Worksheets to bolster children’s comprehension and writing
skills systematically.
Level 5: Paula the Vet (Read with Oxford Stage 4)

lady; claw

tells; lady; nail; needs; clip; gets; snip

12

6. Transition to the primary English curriculum
In supporting the transition to primary school, we aim to equip children with knowledge and
skills that are crucial for early literacy development. To foster language awareness, basic
writing conventions about capitalization and punctuation are introduced at Levels 3-5, whereas
grammar rules focusing on communicative purposes are illustrated at Level 6. To build literacy
skills, children begin by learning letters and letter sounds and progress through reading and
writing at the word level, sentence level and text level. Our programme culminates in the
reading of fiction, non-fiction and poetry readers from Oxford Reading Tree and the completion
of various guided writing tasks, through which we hope that children will come away with
confidence, enthusiasm and a sense of accomplishment.

7. Creating blended learning experiences

Blended learning is a method of teaching that combines technology-mediated activities with faceto-face interactions in a complementary manner. In our programme, teachers have the flexibility
to make use of printed Student’s Books or digital Follow-along PowerPoint decks for delivering
lessons, as well as on-screen or off-screen activities for revision and fun. Beyond the classroom,
children can continue their learning independently with the aid of Oxford Reading Pen. Easy to
use and customize, our teaching and learning resources support teachers and children alike in
creating a multi-faceted blended learning experience that has endless possibilities.

13

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Teaching and learning strategies
Word-level literacy development
(Sight word posters and word
cards Aki Talk
1. to be added)

Hi, I am Aki.

In the programme, a robot called Aki helps teachers to direct children’s attention to
the sound units in a word. The term ‘Aki Talk’ refers to the specific ways we say a word when
we see Aki. It serves to support various aspects of children’s phonological development.
Levels 1-2

Aki Talk (beginning sound)
/c/, /c/, cat

Levels 1-5

Aki Talk (rhyme)
cat, /c/, /at/, cat

(*To be used for consolidation)
Levels 1-5

Aki Talk (blending)
/c/, /at/ … /c/ - /at/, cat

Levels 3-5

Aki Talk (segmenting)
cat, /c/ … /at/

14

2. Blending and segmenting actions

Actions help children to visualize how blending and segmentation work. Teachers can guide
children through performing the actions and saying the sounds simultaneously. Once
children are familiar with oral blending and segmentation, teachers can introduce the Sound
Cards to reinforce children’s understanding of letter-sound correspondence.
Blend the sounds
/c/, /at/ … /c/ - /at/, cat

Join our fists together to
signify the process of
blending an onset and a
rhyme to form a word or a
syllable*.

Segment the words
cat, /c/ … /at/

Pull apart our fists to
signify the process of
segmenting a word
into its onset and
rhyme.

(*From Book 5C onwards, this also reminds
children to blend two syllables into a word.)

3. Learning sight words through frequent reading

Sight words can be high-frequency words (e.g. he, and) or non-decodable words which do not
follow regular phonics rules (e.g. one, enough). To ensure fluency in reading and writing, it is
more efficient if children learn to read and write sight words automatically.
To progressively build up children’s repertoire of sight words, we introduce key sight words
in phonics lessons and ORT reader lessons. We also provide a sight word poster, worksheets
and Oxford Reading Pen for children to refer to the pronunciation and spelling of the sight
words if needed.

15

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Sentence-level literacy development
4. Five reading steps

With the aid of the five reading steps, children are guided to
read a sentence and predict the pronunciation of unfamiliar
words.
Teachers can ask children to hold out their left hands, with
palms facing up, and assign the steps to each finger as follows:
1. Look*

Look at the sentence and read the words you know.

2. Blend

For unknown words,
a. Try to blend onsets and rhymes to sound out the words in Aki Talk.
b. Check the list of sight words and difficult words. Try to memorize their
pronunciation with the help of Oxford Reading Pen or your teacher.
Say the sentence and point to every word when reading along.

3. Read
4. Check
5. Practise

Listen to Oxford Reading Pen or your teacher to check whether the sentence
has been read correctly.
Read the sentence again to improve fluency (as measured by accuracy, speed,
intonation and pauses within a sentence).

*For children who are in their early stage of reading, an optional step, ‘Step 0. Listen and point’, could
be added. Children are encouraged to listen to the sentence before the five steps.
5. Five writing steps

To support children in expressing what they have heard and read
and what they think in writing, we have devised the five writing
steps. Children can learn how to write a sentence containing
words that they may not know how to spell.
Teachers can ask children to hold out their left hands, with palms
facing down, and assign the steps to each finger as follows:
1. Listen
2. Segment

3. Write
4. Check
5. Practise

16

Listen to Oxford Reading Pen or your teacher. Repeat the sentence
accordingly. Write the words you know.
For unknown words,
a. Try to segment the words into onsets and rhymes in Aki Talk.
b. Check the list of sight words and difficult words.
Write the decodable words and copy the sight words. Read the sentence
aloud and make corrections if necessary.
Proofread spelling and punctuation. Then check the answers with your
teacher or against the Student’s Book.
Write the sentence again to reinforce memory.

6. Writing conventions and grammar rules

Apart from the five writing steps, children are introduced to writing conventions and grammar
rules in order to compose sentences that are structurally correct and comprehensible to readers.
In view of linguistic complexity and pedagogical practice, writing conventions are taught first so that children can proofread spelling and punctuation marks simultaneously in the five writing steps.

Writing conventions (Levels 3-5)

Capitalization and punctuation
(e.g. exclamation marks (!))

Grammar rules (Level 6)

Combining words into sentences
(e.g. fantastic → How fantastic!)

Text-level literacy development
7. Text types

Moving along from the sentence level to the text level, we introduce a variety of text types to
acquaint children with their communicative purposes and distinctive features. Children unaware
of text types often have trouble understanding or conveying the gist and specific information in
an organized manner. Through explicit instruction of text types, children will learn to
compartmentalize textual information and communicate more effectively and purposefully.

Picture stories

Riddle poems

17

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Useful tips for teachers
Classroom management
1.

Build rapport with children

It is important to maintain a positive
attitude and create a warm
environment in which children feel
welcome and safe.

Remembering children’s names helps with
bonding. Children feel a stronger sense of
belonging when teachers greet and address
them by name. Name cards can be used to
help teachers to remember children’s names.

For questions that teachers are unable to answer (which happens more often than one
may think), it is helpful to respond to children with replies such as ‘Let’s find out together.’
or ‘Do you think you can find out and tell me?’ This creates the opportunity to learn with
children and build their confidence.

2. Use classroom management tools

Clear classroom rules should be established in the first lesson. In order for children to
understand how to interact with teachers and peers properly in a classroom setting, it is
important to use positive language, e.g. saying ‘Please walk.’ instead of ‘No running.’ Also, it is
best to post the classroom rules where they are visible for all. As children may not read yet,
it is helpful to represent the rules using pictures or symbols.

Simple and concise instructions with
plenty of action should be used when
introducing anything new in the classroom.
It is advisable to shorten and break
instructions into several parts, e.g. saying
‘Use a pencil … Draw a line … (demonstrating
the action) here to here.’

instead of ‘Use your

pencil and draw a line from this point to this
point.’

Simple language and exaggerated
gestures are the key to encouraging children
to engage.

18

Using noises or signals helps to attract
children’s attention.
o Use clapping or bells to get their
attention.
o Raise hands or printed signs to signal
children to keep quiet.
o Use hand gestures or say ‘Let’s
take turns. First it’s my turn and
then it’s yours.’

perform tasks.

to guide children to

3.

Always model and encourage frequent practice of new learning items

Modelling is essential in order for
children to be able to do what they are
asked to do. For example, many children
do not understand the meaning of circling
or the concept of matching words to
pictures, so it is necessary to guide them
slowly by demonstration.

It is acceptable for children to answer
with one word, but teachers should
always model the full and correct
answer for children. Ideally, teachers
should encourage children who are able
to repeat full sentences when they can.

It is important to encourage frequent practice as it takes exposure and repetition for
children to get acquainted with new learning items.

How to teach sounds and vocabulary (word level)

4.

Teach sounds with concrete words

Children find it easier to learn and remember sounds when they are mapped directly
onto concrete objects and actions relevant to daily life. Instead of teaching sounds in
isolation, it is advisable to teach with concrete key words (e.g. introducing the
beginning sound /c/ with the words ‘cat’ and ‘cut’).

5.

Consolidate vocabulary knowledge in terms of meaning, sound and form

To be able to understand a word verbally and textually, children need to establish
connections across its meaning, sound and form. Teachers can help to improve relevant
sensitivities through sorting games. Children are guided to sort words into different
aspects:
o Meaning (e.g. Which words refer to actions/things?);
o Sound (e.g. Which words share the same onset/rhyme?);
o Form (e.g. Which words share the same beginning letter/rhyme family?).

19

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

How to teach grammar, reading and writing (sentence and text levels)

6.

Introduce basic grammar rules in terms of form, meaning and use
Traditionally, much focus was given to
grammatical form. Mounting research
suggests that it is crucial to teach grammar
in terms of form, meaning and use. Our
examples and teaching notes on PowerPoint
slides are child-centred and context-based,
aiming to show how grammar helps
children to construct and express their ideas
in daily lives for effective communication.

To assist children in mastering grammar
rules, which are fundamental for making
sensible sentences, teachers can present
grammatical structures as whole chunks
(e.g. I like, it has) without spending too
much time on structural analysis.
Memorized chunks help children to
produce similar sentences and serve as the
basis for generalizing the underlying rules.
7.

Be aware that idea goes hand in hand with language (literacy strategies on pp.14-17)

Some primary and secondary students often feel intimidated in writing classes because they
lack ideas! We all know that reading helps; however, it is extensive and purposeful reading
of diverse text types and themes that is most important. Teachers can take opportunities to
evoke curiosity and cultivate appreciation of literary works. Also, it is vital to encourage
children to brainstorm, share ideas and learn from each other using the activities in the
Student’s Books.

Developmental milestones
8.

Teach children how to handle books

Children may not be familiar with
numbers yet. Teachers should be
patient and guide children to turn
pages in the first few lessons.

9.

Children may have trouble placing their books
upright. They also may not be able to flip one
page at a time. Demonstrate how to flip the
pages slowly and the finger movements needed.

Teach letter-writing in a developmentally appropriate order

Hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills are crucial for developing handwriting skills.
At Levels 1 and 2, we build children’s hand-eye coordination skills and confidence in using
writing tools. It is advisable to pay attention to children’s pencil-holding skills and maintain
an accommodating attitude towards their developing penmanship skills.

20

Gripping position:
o Children’s fine motor skills are not
yet well developed, and they may
grip the pencil with their entire
palms.

o Children should gradually be able
to use the tripod grip.

Drawing lines:
o Lines will not be straight in matching
exercises.

o At Level 4, children should start to
learn how to draw straight lines with
rulers. They need to be reminded that
one hand should always be on the ruler.

Children may behave differently when they are asked to complete colouring exercises.
o Some children will scribble several lines. If time allows, teachers should encourage
children to fill in the uncoloured sections.
o Some children will take a very long time to colour. In this case, teachers can encourage
them to move on and colour after the lesson.

Stroke sequence is less
important for writing English
letters, as opposed to Chinese
characters for example. In our
programme, we teach letter
formation using the D’Nealian
handwriting style.

Reversing letters (e.g. ‘b’ written as ‘d’, ‘tac’
written for ‘cat’) is common in many children until
the age of seven. Teachers can strengthen
children’s letter-writing skills through kinaesthetic
activities, such as tracing the letters, using hand
gestures to remember the letter shapes, writing on
the arms and decorating the letters in a word.

10. Be patient with the gradual development of syllable counting skills

Initially children might not be able to count the number of syllables in a word correctly for
various reasons: they might be preoccupied with learning the target words, or new learning
routines and methods. However, across a period of 6 to 8 months, children’s accuracy rate is
likely to improve drastically (say 33% to over 75%).
In our programme, there is basically a whole year for children to master the skill of syllable
counting (i.e. reaching 90% accuracy rate) for words with three or fewer syllables.

21

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

11. Be aware of the gaps between visual and articulation skills

It is common that some children may manage to associate letters with particular sounds but
not succeed in articulating those sounds correctly. This is particularly prevalent when it
comes to articulating sounds that are acquired later in the oral language acquisition process
(e.g. /s/, /r/ and /z/).
In our programme, the sequence of introducing letter sounds at Levels 1-2 is largely based on
the speech sound development model known as ‘Early, Middle, Late 8s’ (Shriberg, 1993).
While most challenging letter sounds are introduced towards
the end of Level 2, it could well be that some younger children
still have difficulty in pronouncing them. It is advisable not to
pressure these children as long as they are able to recognize
the sounds and form the correct letter-sound correspondences
at this point in their linguistic development.

Oral motor exercises
(p.81) are recommended
in order for children to
improve their
pronunciation.

12. Be patient with the gradual development of blending and segmenting skills

When children have difficulty in blending sounds or segmenting words, this may be the
result of poor sound recognition or difficulties with the manipulation of sound units.
We have an exhaustive list of
game ideas (pp.60-67) which
specifically help to strengthen
children’s sound recognition and
blending and segmenting skills.

Frequent practice of Aki Talk will be helpful as
well. A lot of demonstration, modelling, guided and
independent practice will be needed before children
achieve a 90% accuracy rate in blending and
segmentation.

13. Identify children’s developmental strengths to maximize learning outcomes

Children under 7 are not yet able to learn grammatical rules by explication, but they can capitalize
on their excellent inductive skills and memory ability. It is advisable to expose children to ample
examples in meaningful contexts so that they can accumulate the data and make generalizations.
Children under 7 have a more nativelike accent as they have a strong ability
to command their articulators of speech.
Second-language learning for children (Steinberg, 1993)
Shriberg, L D. (1993). Four New Speech and Prosody-Voice Measures for Genetics Research and Other Studies in
Developmental Phonological Disorders. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 36 (1): 105–40.
Steinberg, D. D. (1993). An Introduction to Psycholinguistics. London: Longman.

22

Terms and concepts
Phonics: Phonics is a method for systematically and sequentially teaching the relationships
between sounds and letters. It equips children with practical knowledge and skills for
decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling) words.
Phonological awareness (PA): PA is the ability to recognize and manipulate different sound
units in a language, including words, syllables, onsets, rhymes and individual sounds.
Orthographic awareness (OA): OA is the ability to recognize correct letter patterns within
words, and also recognize whole words. This skill directly impacts children’s fluency in
reading and writing.
Syllable: Syllables are the sound units that constitute words. We can break words into
syllables. For example, ‘cat’ has one syllable and ‘apples’ has two syllables. A syllable is a
sound unit that consists of small units such as an onset and a rhyme.
Onset: In a syllable (or a word comprised of one syllable), the onset is the sound(s) that
come(s) before a vowel, e.g. ‘c’ as in ‘cat’.
Rhyme: In a syllable (or a word comprised of one syllable), the rhyme is the rest of the
sounds after an onset, or the vowel sound and all sounds that come after it, e.g. ‘at’ as in ‘cat’.
Blending: This involves combining individual sounds or sound units to form words, e.g. /b/ +
/in/ → ‘bin’.
Segmentation: This involves breaking words into individual sounds or sound units, e.g.
‘sock’ → ‘s’, ‘ock’.
Digraph: A digraph is one sound represented by two letters, e.g. /ch/, /sh/, /ph/.
Consonant cluster: A consonant cluster is a group of consonants that appear together in a
word. Each consonant in the cluster retains its own sound in blending, e.g. /pl/ as in ‘play’,
/thr/ as in ‘three’.
Orthographic syllable type: An orthographic syllable type refers to a visual letter pattern
that represents a particular sound pattern. The English language has six common syllable
types: Closed, Vowel-Consonant-e, Vowel Team, R-controlled, Open and Consonant-le.
Sight word: A sight word is a word that can be instantly recognized as a whole without the
need to decode it. This can be a high-frequency word or a non-decodable word with irregular
patterns. Children are encouraged to memorize sight words in order to read more fluently.

23

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Content structure
[Foundation Year 1] Level 1
Material

Unit

Sounds

Book 1A

1

a

alligator, act, animals, ankle, ant, apple, astronaut, axe

2

d

dog, dig, dance, dinosaur, dirty, doctor, dolphin, duck

3

m

monkey, mop, mat, medicine, melt, mix, muddy, mum

4

b

bee, bake, ball, bear, big, bite, butterfly, buy

5

-ad

bad, dad, mad (onsets: b, d, m)

6

t

turtle, tap, table, take, talk, telephone, touch, two

7

h

hippo, hide, hand, hat, heavy, hop, hug, hungry

8

c

cat, cut, cake, car, caterpillar, cold, cook, cover

9

f

fish, fly, fall, family, finger, flamingo, fog, full

10

-at

11

Revision

Book 1B

Words
Lesson flow p.38

Lesson flow p.42

cat, fat, hat (onsets: c, f, h)
Lesson flow p.46

elephant, empty, egg, elbow, elder, enter, envelope, excellent

n

nightingale, nod, new, newspaper, noisy, noodles, nose, nut

14

p

penguin, paint, panda, pencil, pink, point, potato, push

15

k

koala, kiss, kangaroo, key, kick, kind, kitchen, kite

16

-en

17

l

lion, laugh, lamp, library, listen, long, look, love

18

g

goat, go, garden, girl, give, glue, goldfish, good

19

w

whale, wash, walk, water, watermelon, wave, window, windy

20

-et

get, net, pet, wet (onsets: g, n, p, w)

21

24

e

13

Worksheets

12

Revision

22

Reading Fun: The Big Cod (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)

hen, Ken, pen, ten (onsets: h, k, p, t)

Lesson flow p.49

In the letter sound units of Books 1A-2B, the story scripts
are printed for the reference of teachers and parents.
Children are only expected to listen to the stories, but not
to read them.

Story scripts
a

Anna Alligator is acting in a film. She is a queen and drinks her tea.

d

Duncan Dog likes to dig. He digs a hole. What does he find? He finds a dinosaur!

m

There is some milk on the floor. Martin Monkey is mopping the floor. Oh no! He slips and
bumps his head on the door. ‘Ouch!’ Poor Martin Monkey!

b

Bobby Bee is baking a bun. ‘Bobby Bee, may I have the bun, please?’

-ad

Dad is in a bad mood. His dog wants to make him happy. She wants Dad to go out and play.
She pulls Dad. Dad is mad. Dad says, ‘Bad dog!’ The dog is in a bad mood now.

t

Tina Turtle loves music. When the music is on, she can tap her feet to the beat. Well done,
Tina Turtle!
Helen Hippo and the little hamster are playing hide-and-seek. Helen Hippo hides behind a
tree. Can the little hamster find Helen Hippo?
Carol Cat is cutting a cake. She cuts and cuts and cuts. ‘Hooray!’ Carol Cat is tired. She wants
to take a break. ‘Carol Cat, take a break!’ ‘Phew!’

h
c
f

Felix Fish can fly. He can fly high up into the sky. Oh no! A fox is waiting for Felix Fish.

-at

Carol Cat is scared. She sees a moving hat. Look! What is that? It is a fat mouse!

e

Oh no! An egg falls into the pool. Ella Elephant empties the pool to save the egg. ‘Thank you,
Ella Elephant!’
It is night-time but Nora Nightingale is not asleep. At night, Nora Nightingale likes to nod her
head and sing a song.

n
p
k
-en

l
g
w
-et

Peggy Penguin and Panda need to paint a wall. But Panda is playing around so Peggy Penguin
paints the wall herself.
Katie Koala has a toy, Singing Kangaroo. Katie likes to kiss it and it can sing all day long.
‘Kiss, kiss, kiss, kiss all day long. Kiss, kiss, kiss, kiss all day long.’
Ken tells his brother and sister, ‘I have a new pen.’ Ken’s sister asks, ‘Can you draw a
hen?’ Ken draws a hen for his sister. Ken’s brother asks, ‘Can you write ten?’ Ken writes ten
on a piece of paper. Dad comes and says, ‘Well done, Ken.’
Leo Lion likes to laugh. He is playing with Bobby Bee, Carol Cat and Inky Iguana. What
makes him laugh so loudly?
Gary Goat likes to go to school. He likes to go to the classroom. He likes to go to the music
room. Gary Goat likes to go around the school. ‘My school is cool!’
William Whale likes to wash his body. ‘I like to wash my body. I like to wash my tail.’
Splash! Splash! Splash!
Ken has a big net. He catches a small animal and puts it into his bag. ‘Hooray! I have a
pet.’ Ken shows his pet to Pam. She touches the small animal in the bag. ‘Oh, what is this?
It is wet.’ Suddenly, the small animal jumps out of the bag. Pam is scared. ‘Get it, Ken!’

25

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Foundation Year 1] Level 2
Material

Unit

Sounds

Book 2A

23

o

ox, offer, October, octopus, off, on, omelette, orange

24

j

jellyfish, jump, jacket, jam, jelly, jog, jug, juggle

25

-og

dog, fog, jog, log (onsets: d, f, j, l )

26

-ot

cot, dot, hot, pot (onsets: c, d, h, p)

27

u

umbrellabird, untie, ugly, umbrella, uncle, under, undress, unhappy

28

s

snail, sing, sad, sandcastle, sit, sock, soft, sunny

29

r

rabbit, run, rainy, read, rectangle, repair, rich, ride

30

-un

bun, fun, run, sun (onsets: b, f, r, s)

31

-ug

bug, hug, jug, mug (onsets: b, h, j, m)

32
Book 2B

Words

Revision

33

i

iguana, invite, igloo, ill, insect, inside, instruments

34

q

quail, quick, quack, queen, question, quiet, quilt

35

-in

bin, tin, win (onsets: b, t, w)

36

-ick

kick, lick, pick, quick (onsets: k, l, p, qu)

37

y

yak, yawn, yacht, yell, yellow, yoga, young, yo-yo

38

v

vulture, visit, valuable, van, vase, vegetables, vet, village

39

-an

40

z

zebra, zip, zero, zigzag, zoo, zoom

41

x

fox, mix, box, fix, six, wax

fan, man, pan, van (onsets: f, m, p, v)

42

26

43

Reading Fun: Bob Bug (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)

44

Worksheets

Revision

Yearly Assessment

Story scripts
o

Harry is carrying many bags. Oliver Ox offers to help Harry. ‘May I help you?’ Oliver Ox is
very kind. ‘Thank you, Oliver Ox.’

j

Johnny Jellyfish likes to jump. He jumps from a mug to a jug. ‘Watch out! Don’t jump onto
the floor.’

-og

Ben likes to jog. Ben has a dog. He jogs with his dog every day. There is a thick fog. Ben
cannot see clearly. Suddenly, his dog jumps. His dog barks and barks. Oh! There is a log. Ben
almost falls!

-ot

Max Fox is holding a pot. The pot is hot. Mummy Fox shouts, ‘Don’t come near the cot!
Put the pot on the dot.’ Poor Max Fox, the pot is really hot.

u

It is Umber Umbrellabird’s birthday. He wants to unwrap a present. First, he unties the
ribbons. Who is it from and what is inside, Umber Umbrellabird?

s

Simon Snail likes to sing. Bobby Bee likes to dance. Look! Simon Snail and Bobby Bee sing
and dance together.

r

Rita Rabbit likes to run. She likes to run in the sun. ‘Oh, what fun!’ Rita Rabbit can run very
fast. ‘Hooray! Rita Rabbit is the best!’

-un

The rain stops. The sun is out. Rita Rabbit says to her friend, ‘Let’s run.’ They run and run
in the sun. They feel hungry and say, ‘Let’s eat a bun.’ The rabbits are happy and they cheer,
‘This is fun!’

-ug

It is wintertime. A small bug is in a mug. A big bug is in a jug. The small bug is cold. He
flies to the jug to visit the big bug. The big bug says happily, ‘Let’s hug.’

i

Inky Iguana wants to invite her friends to her birthday party. ‘Welcome! Come in, please!’ An
insect is on a cupcake. Guess what happens next?
It is raining. All the birds are wet and cannot fly. ‘Oh! It is raining!’ ‘Oops! I am wet!’
Quinton Quail has an idea. ‘Quick! Let’s get on a train!’
Carol Cat and Peter Cat are at the funfair. They play a throwing game. Carol Cat says,
‘Ball in the bin.’ Their balls go into the bins. Peter Cat says, ‘Ball in the tin.’ Peter Cat’s ball
goes into his tin, but Carol Cat’s ball misses her tin. Peter Cat says, ‘Hooray! I win!’
Amy wants to play with her dog, Nick. Amy says, ‘Pick a toy, Nick!’ Nick touches the ball.
Amy throws the ball. She says, ‘Quick, Nick! Quick!’ However, Nick does not want to get
the ball. He wants to eat the biscuits in Amy’s pocket. He licks Amy’s face. Amy laughs,
‘Nick, don’t lick!’ Where is the ball? Two boys kick the ball.

q
-in

-ick

y
v
-an
z
x

Yanny Yak is very tired. ‘I am tired.’ She yawns and yawns. Yanny Yak falls asleep on the
lawn.
Vicky Vulture wants to visit her family. She is driving her van. Vroom! Vroom! Vroom! Vicky
Vulture drives fast.
A man is in a van. He is hot. He says, ‘I need a fan.’ Anna Alligator wants to help the man.
She brings him a pan. The man says, ‘I need a fan, not a pan!’
Zack Zebra puts on a boot. He zips up the boot. He puts on a suit. ‘Nice!’
Max Fox likes to mix. He puts everything in his cup. ‘Mix, mix, mix. Abracadabra!’ Who is
that?

27

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Foundation Year 2] Level 3
Material

Unit

Book 3A

45

Rhymes

Onsets

Words

Revision and new start

46

cap, clap, gap, tap

-ig

b, d, f, tw

big, dig, fig, twig

48

-ell

b, sh, sp, y

bell, shell, spell, yell

49

-ock

bl, cl, l, s

50

Revision

Lesson flow p.59

51

Reading Fun 1: Get the Rat! (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)

Lesson flow p.62

52
Book 3B

c, cl, g, t

47

Worksheets

-ap

Reading Fun 2: Get the Rat! (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)

Lesson flow p.64

Lesson flow p.51

block, clock, lock, sock

ch, h, m, st

chop, hop, mop, stop

-ack

bl, cr, p, s

black, crack, pack, sack

55

-est

b, ch, n, r

best, chest, nest, rest

56

-ink

dr, p, s, th

drink, pink, sink, think

57

Revision

58

Reading Fun 1: The Big Carrot (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)

59
Book 3C

-op

54

Worksheets

53

Reading Fun 2: The Big Carrot (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 1)
ch, d, l, z

chip, dip, lip, zip

-all

b, f, sm, w

ball, fall, small, wall

62

-ing

k, r, s, sw

king, ring, sing, swing

63

-uck

cl, d, l, tr

cluck, duck, luck, truck

64

Revision

65

Reading Fun 1: The King and His Wish (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

66

28

-ip

61

Worksheets

60

Reading Fun 2: The King and His Wish (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

Story scripts
-ap

Martin Monkey plays a game with the little monkeys. ‘Martin says clap your hands,’ says
Martin. The little monkeys clap their hands. ‘Well done!’ says Martin. ‘Martin says tap your
feet.’ The little monkeys tap their feet. ‘Amazing!’ says Martin. ‘Martin says put on your
cap.’ Every little monkey puts on a cap. ‘Fantastic!’ says Martin. ‘Jump over the gap.’
Whoa! The little monkeys all jump over the gap! Martin is surprised.

-ig

Gary Goat sees something on the ground. There is a fig. Gary gets close to the fig. The fig is
big. Gary says, ‘Wow! What a big fig!’ He thinks, ‘I want to grow a big fig tree.’ Gary wants
to dig. He looks for a twig. Gary sees a twig near the bushes. He tries to pick it up. Oh, that
is not a twig! It is a snake!

-ell

It is time for show-and-tell. A boy shows the other children his bell. He says, ‘I have a bell.’
It is a pretty bell. Then a girl shows a big shell. She says, ‘I have a shell.’ A boy shows off his
bird. He says, ‘I have a bird. My bird can spell.’ The bird says, ‘B-i-r-d, bird.’ All the
children yell.

-ock

It is Christmas. Santa is delivering presents. ‘Ho, ho, ho!’ Santa opens a lock. He sees a
sock. Santa says, ‘Ho, ho! A lovely Christmas sock!’ He walks towards the sock. He steps on
a block. He bumps into a clock. ‘Ouch!’ The clock goes tick, tick, tock. Oh no! Don’t wake
everyone up, Santa!

-op

Becky has a mop. She mops the floor. Becky says, ‘I can mop.’ The floor is clean now. Becky
says, ‘I can hop.’ She rides on the mop and hops around. Suddenly, she does a karate chop.
She says, ‘I can chop.’ Mum shouts, ‘Stop!’ Oh no, Becky chops the mop in half!

-ack

Zack Zebra needs to pack for his trip. There are so many things that he wants to bring with
him! He has a new black suitcase. It soon gets too full of his things. Oh no! There is a
crack in his suitcase. He cannot use it anymore! Poor Zack Zebra carries everything in a
sack.

-est

Martin Monkey has a race with Simon Snail, Tina Turtle and Rita Rabbit. He runs fast and
soon he is ahead of them. Look! Martin Monkey is taking a rest. Something drops onto his
chest. It is a baby bird! He takes the bird back to the nest. In the end, Martin Monkey does
not win the race, but his friends say, ‘You are the best.’
Ella Elephant and Helen Hippo are in the kitchen. Ella says, ‘Look!’ There is a pink drink in
the sink. ‘Let’s try some.’ Ella tries the pink drink. ‘Yummy!’ Ella loves the pink drink. She
says, ‘Helen, try some!’ Helen says, ‘Mmm… Ok.’ Helen tries the pink drink. Ella asks,
‘What do you think?’ Helen shakes her head. She says, ‘Yuck, I don’t like this drink!’

-ink

-ip

-all

-ing

-uck

Mum is out. Ken and his sister find a bag on the table. ‘Let’s open the zip,’ says Ken. They
take out some chips. Ken likes to eat chips with sauce. He says, ‘Dip the chip.’ Mum comes
back. Ken quickly tells his sister, ‘Lick your lip.’
Katie Koala plays with a small ball. Katie throws the ball to Peggy Penguin. The ball flies
high. Oops! The ball is on a wall. Katie says, ‘Sorry.’ Peggy says, ‘Never mind.’ Katie
climbs up the wall. She wants to get the small ball. Peggy shouts, ‘Watch out, don’t fall!’
The king is sad. He cannot find his ring. The princess wants to cheer him up, ‘Let me sing
you a song, Dad.’ The king loves the song. The princess has another idea, ‘Let me make you
a ring, Dad. The king is happy with his new ring. He says, ‘Thank you!’ Oh look!
Something is on the swing.
Uncle Tuck is driving his truck. ‘Cluck, cluck...’ A hen and some chicks cross the road.
Uncle Tuck stops his truck and waits. Then he drives again. ‘Quack, quack…’ A duck and
some ducklings cross the road too. Uncle Tuck stops his truck and another car. All the
animals are in luck. There is yummy food on the other side of the road.

29

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Foundation Year 2] Level 4
Material

Unit

Rhymes

Onsets

Book 4A

67

-ake

b, c, sh, sn

68

-ine

l, n, p, v

69

-one

b, c, ph, st

70

Revision

71

Reading Fun 1: Sue Kangaroo (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

72

Reading Fun 2: Sue Kangaroo (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Worksheets

Book 4B

Words
bake, cake, shake, snake
line, nine, pine, vine
bone, cone, phone, stone

b, s, thr, tr

-ie

l, p, t

75

-ue

bl, cl, gl, tr

blue, clue, glue, true

76

-ail

n, sn, t, w

nail, snail, tail, wail

77

-oat

b, c, fl, g

boat, coat, float, goat

78

Revision

79

Reading Fun 1: Leek Hotpot (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

80
Book 4C

-ee

74

Worksheets

73

bee, see, three, tree

Reading Fun 2: Leek Hotpot (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

lie, pie, tie

d, pl, st, w

-oy

b, j, r, t

83

-aw

cl, dr, j, str

claw, draw, jaw, straw

84

-ight

n, r, s, t

night, right, sight, tight

85

Revision

86

Reading Fun 1: Pirates (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

87

Reading Fun 2: Pirates (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

88

30

-ay

82

Worksheets

81

day, play, stay, way

Yearly Assessment

boy, joy, Roy, toy

Story scripts
-ake

Grandma is in the kitchen. Grandma wants to bake a cake. ‘Shake, shake, shake! Oh!’ A
snake is in the oven. Grandma says, ‘Wake up, you silly snake!’ Grandma asks, ‘Do you want
some cake?’ The snake says, ‘Yes, please.’

-ine

It is a bright sunny day. Nine porcupines see a vine. They have an idea. One porcupine
draws a line on the ground. Then the porcupines form two teams. The porcupines pull the
vine. They pull and pull, pull and pull … Oh no! They pull too hard. Some porcupines fall
back into a pine tree! Some porcupines are in the air!

-one

Timmy kicks a stone. It hits something. Timmy is curious. He digs and digs. Timmy cries,
‘Wow! What a big bone!’ Timmy gets his phone out. Timmy talks to his dad over the
phone. He tells Dad about the big bone. ‘Dad, I found a big bone!’ Dad comes and marks the
spot with a cone.

-ee

Bobby Bee has a bag of snacks. The bag is heavy. Bobby Bee flies and flies. He flies to a big
tree. Keep going, Bobby Bee! Bobby Bee looks happy. Who does he see? Three bees are
waiting for Bobby Bee to have tea. ‘Come on, Bobby Bee!’ They have a picnic at the top of
the tree. All the bees are happy.

-ie

Grandma and Pam are in the kitchen. Grandma and Pam bake an apple pie. Grandma
wants to lie down and rest. An hour later, Pam finds that the oven door is open. The pie is
gone. There is a tie on the floor! She shouts, ‘Grandma, where is our pie?’ Grandma and
Pam follow the crumbs, and they are surprised. Dad is eating the apple pie.

-ue

Miss Sue plays a game with the children. She covers something with a piece of cloth. A boy
makes a guess. He says, ‘It is a sausage.’ Miss Sue replies, ‘False.’ Then a girl makes a guess.
She says, ‘It is a tube of glue.’ Miss Sue replies, ‘False.’ The girl is puzzled. She asks, ‘Can
you give us a clue?’ Miss Sue says, ‘It can turn something blue.’ The children shout, ‘It is a
crayon!’ Miss Sue shows them the crayon and says, ‘True.’

-ail

Carol Cat lets out a wail. Ella Elephant comes and asks, ‘What’s wrong?’ Carol runs round
and round. She cries, ‘Help! Something is on my tail!’ Ella takes a close look and says, ‘It is a
small snail.’ Ella gets the snail off Carol’s tail. Carol says, ‘Phew! Thank you, Ella!’ Ella says,
‘You are welcome. Look! Now the small snail is on my big nail!’
Gary Goat wears a new coat. His friends say, ‘What a nice coat, Gary Goat!’ ‘Wow! Gary
Goat, your coat is cool!’ Gary Goat and his friends take a boat. He takes pictures of himself.
He is so happy! His friends shout, ‘Watch out!’ Oh no! Gary Goat falls off the boat. Luckily,
Gary Goat can float. ‘Phew!’

-oat

-ay

It is a sunny day. Ella Elephant is on her way to meet Helen Hippo. Ella says, ‘Let’s play!’
Suddenly, it starts to rain. ‘Oh no!’ ‘Look! There is a banana tree.’ Ella and Helen stay
under a big leaf. They say, ‘What a rainy day!’ Ella and Helen hear some sounds and look up
at the leaf. They see their friends. Ella says, ‘Hi, Bobby Bee! Hi, Simon Snail!’ Helen says,
‘What a happy day!’

-oy

Roy plays with his toy. It is a robot. It is his favourite toy. Mum cooks in the kitchen and says,
‘Are you hungry, my boy?’ Roy is hungry. He runs to the kitchen and nods his head. Mum
says, ‘Let me boil an egg for you.’ Roy loves eggs. He jumps for joy. Roy says, ‘Thank you,
Mum!’
Dawn wants to draw a dinosaur. Look! The dinosaur has a big jaw and a small claw. The
dinosaur wants to drink some water, but it is far away. What can Dawn do? Dawn draws a
straw for the dinosaur. Now it can drink water through the straw.

-aw

-ight

Dad holds me tight in the starry night. Shooting stars fly across the night sky. Some fly to
the left, and some to the right! I am excited. ‘Look, Dad. Look!’ Dad and I are amazed by
what we see. What a beautiful sight!

31

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Enrichment Year 3] Level 5
Material

Unit

Book 5A

89

Rhymes

Onsets

Words

Revision and new start

90

c, f, j, st

91

-orn

h, th, t, worn

92

-irt

d, sh, sk

93

Revision

94

Reading Fun 1: Green Planet Kids (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

95

Worksheets

-ar

Reading Fun 2: Green Planet Kids (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Material

Unit

Topics

Onsets

Rhymes

Book 5B

96

silent k

kn

ee, ife,

car, far, jar, star
horn, thorn, torn, worn
dirt, shirt, skirt

Words
knee, knife, knock, knot

ock, ot
97

silent w

wr

ap, ist,

wrap, wrist, write, wrong

ite, ong
98

silent b

cl, c,
cr, th

imb, omb, climb, comb, crumb, thumb
umb

99
100

Reading Fun 1: The Wrong Kind of Knight (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

101

Worksheets

Revision

Reading Fun 2: The Wrong Kind of Knight (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Material

Unit

Syllable types

Sounds

Book 5C

102

closed syllables

-ing

103

open syllables

-a

apron, bacon, basin, raven

104

open syllables

-o

broken, frozen, open, robot

105

closed and open
syllables
Revision

-le

bottle, cradle, cuddle, rattle

106
Worksheets

Words
clapping, jogging, running, winning

Reading Fun 1: Paula the Vet (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 4)

108

Reading Fun 2: Paula the Vet (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 4)

109

Reading Fun 3: My Cat (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

110

32

107

Reading Fun 4: My Cat (ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Lesson flow
p.56

Story scripts
-ar

Leo Lion and Vicky Vulture are in a car race. Leo Lion says, ‘Let’s drive to the far end of
the track.’ Vicky Vulture says, ‘Sure, here we go! The winner will get a star.’ The cars go fast.
Vroom! Vroom! Leo Lion speeds up his car. Suddenly, a cart passes by. Vicky Vulture shouts,
‘Watch out, Leo!’ Leo Lion’s car hits a jar. In the end, Vicky Vulture wins a star.

-orn

Gary Goat is skipping in the garden. Nora Nightingale cheers for him. ‘Wow! Keep going!’
Gary Goat is excited. He skips faster and faster. Oh no! Gary Goat’s horn gets caught on the
rope. ‘Ouch!’ Gary Goat falls. He tears his jeans on the thorns. Nora Nightingale says, ‘Oh,
your jeans are torn.’ Gary Goat looks at his jeans. ‘It is all right. My worn jeans look cool
now.’

-irt

After the rain, the sun is out again. Jade puts on her sunglasses, T-shirt and favourite skirt.
She takes her dog for a walk. Ben walks his dog too. The two dogs meet. They wag their
tails. What do they want to do? The dogs jump into the mud puddle! Splash! Splash! There is
dirt all over Jade’s skirt and Ben’s shirt.

silent k

Today is Carol Cat’s birthday. Her parents give her a big birthday cake. Carol Cat cuts the
cake with a knife. Suddenly, there are some loud knocks at the door. Knock! Knock! She is
surprised and drops a piece of cake. ‘Oh no! It is all over my knee,’ says Carol Cat. She
opens the door and sees a big box. She unties the knot. ‘Happy Birthday, Carol Cat!’ say
Inky Iguana and Quinton Quail as they jump out of the box. What a surprise! Carol Cat is
happy.

silent w Dad moves a box. He hurts his wrist. ‘Ouch!’ Lily comes to help. She brings her toy first-aid
kit and says, ‘Don’t worry! I’ll wrap your wrist up.’ Lily wraps a bandage around Dad’s
wrist. When it is done, Lily asks, ‘Can I write ‘Get well soon’ on your bandage?’ Dad finally
draws back his hand and says, ‘Lily, thank you, but this is the wrong wrist.’
silent b

Martin Monkey and Zack Zebra go up the hill. The view is nice. Martin Monkey says, ‘Let
me climb the tree.’ Martin Monkey eats a cake at the top of the tree. ‘Yum! Yum!’ There
are some crumbs on Martin Monkey’s thumb. He shakes them off. The crumbs fall on
Zack Zebra’s hair. He is unhappy. He says, ‘Now I have to comb my hair.’ Martin Monkey
says, ‘Sorry! I’ll use a napkin next time.’

-ing

Red Team and Blue Team have a race. Look! Duncan Dog and Max Fox are running fast.
Duncan Dog passes the baton to his teammate Anna Alligator. Max Fox passes the baton to his
teammate Yanny Yak too. Yanny Yak says, ‘Hmm...I’m so sleepy. I don’t want to run.’ Oh no!
Yanny Yak is jogging. Anna Alligator is winning. She runs very fast. Finally, Anna Alligator
reaches the finishing line first. The winner is Red Team. Hooray! The crowd is clapping.

-a

Rachel Raven wants to make a bacon sandwich for breakfast. She takes some bacon,
lettuce and tomatoes out of the fridge. ‘The bacon looks yummy!’ says Rachel. She puts on
her apron and then cooks some bacon in the pan. ‘Great! It’s all done! It’s time to taste my
sandwich,’ says Rachel, ‘Yum! Yum! Yum!’ The bacon sandwich is tasty. Rachel eats her
breakfast happily. There is ketchup all over her face and wings. Rachel washes in the basin.
Why does she look so happy? What does she have in mind?
Romeo the robot is a chef. He gets an order for grilled fish. ‘Let me open the freezer to get
a fish.’ Romeo the robot takes the food out of the freezer, but there is something wrong. Two
frozen fish are stuck together. What can Romeo the robot do? He has an idea. ‘I’ll break
this in two.’ He tries to take the two frozen fish apart with his knife, but they slip. Romeo the
robot hits the chopping board by accident. Bang! The chopping board is broken in half.

-o

-le

I have a little brother, who is a baby. My little brother is crying in the middle of the night.
How can I calm my crying brother? I give him his bottle. I shake a rattle too. Oh no! He is
still crying. Finally, I cuddle my little brother and sing him a song. It works! He stops
crying. Now he is sound asleep in his cradle.

33

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Enrichment Year 3] Level 6
Material

Unit

Lesson

Reader

Book 6A
(Fiction)

111

Reading Fun 1

112

Reading Fun 2

Home for a Night
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

113

Reading Fun 3

114

Reading Fun 4

115

Writing Fun 1

Home for a Night & A New Classroom

116

Writing Fun 2

Home for a Night

117

Writing Fun 3

A New Classroom

118

Reading Fun 1

119

Reading Fun 2

Zoom In!
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 2)

120

Reading Fun 3

121

Reading Fun 4

122

Writing Fun 1

Zoom In! & Can Fish Fly?

123

Writing Fun 2

Zoom in!

124

Writing Fun 3

Can Fish Fly?

125

Reading Fun 1

126

Reading Fun 2

I Can Read! Oxford Poetry For
5 Year Olds: ‘Seasons of Trees’
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 4)

127

Reading Fun 3

128

Reading Fun 4

I Can Read! Oxford Poetry For
5 Year Olds: ‘Pets’
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 4)

129

Writing Fun 1

‘Seasons of Trees’ & ‘Pets’

130

Writing Fun 2

‘Seasons of Trees’

131

Writing Fun 3

‘Pets’

132

Yearly Assessment

Book 6B
(Non-fiction)

Book 6C
(Poems)

Worksheets

34

Lesson flow p.67
Lesson flow p.69

A New Classroom
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Can Fish Fly?
(ORT Read with Oxford Stage 3)

Lesson flow p.72
Lesson flow p.74

Unit

Learning focus
Reading:
Learn the text type

111
112
113
114

Grammar in use

Writing:
Learn the text type

Picture stories
(format)
Picture stories
(elements)
- It is (noun).
- How (adjective)!

115
116

Conversations

117

Comic strips

118

Guided writing

Conversations
e.g. It is a robot.
How cute!
Comic strips
e.g. What is it?
It is a toilet.
It is upside down.
How strange!

Information reports

119
120
121

Book covers
Contents pages
- I have / It has (noun).
- Plural nouns

122
123

Picture descriptions

124

Photo captions

125

Picture descriptions
e.g. I have a cat.
… lots of toys …
Photo captions
e.g. It is a bird.
It has two wings.

Poems (format)

126
127

Poems (elements)

128
129

- It is (adjective).
- I like / It likes (noun).

130

Shape poems

131

Riddle poems

Shape poems
e.g. I like spring.
It is warm.
Riddle poems
e.g. I have a pet.
It is green.
It has two wings.
It likes nuts.

35

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Key to symbols and other conventions
Follow-along PowerPoint decks

Icons:
Listen to the story

Listen to the word

Listen to Aki Talk

Notes to teachers:
Grey roman fonts

Suggested teaching steps

Grey italic fonts

Suggested prompts or instructions

Pink roman fonts

Remarks about when to click for animations

Guided questions:
The guided questions serve as prompts
during storytelling. Teachers should always
model the correct and full sentence answers
when going through these questions.

36

Comprehension questions:
The comprehension questions are
designed to be similar to the guided
questions so that children will feel
confident when answering them. Children
are not expected to answer in full
sentences, but teachers should model full
sentences.
Extended comprehension questions:
There are questions that explore concepts
outside of the story and may include
morally correct or incorrect behaviours.
Teachers should take this chance to help to
develop more whole person learning in this
programme by modelling morally correct
behaviour.

Lesson flows in this Teacher’s Guide
Suggested duration (minutes)

Abbreviations:
S / Ss = Student(s)
T = Teacher

Icons:
Interaction pattern

Individuals

Pairs

Whole class

Delivery

On-screen

Off-screen

Deskwork

Additional teaching
resources needed

Sound Cards

Word Cards

37

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 - Letter sounds

/

Revision

Learn the letter
name and sound

Teaching demo

2

1. Show 3-4 Word Cards one by one.
2. Have Ss say the words.
3. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (beginning sound),
e.g. /a/, /a/, act.

2
1. Introduce the letter name. Have Ss say the letter
name.
2. Introduce the letter sound: ’When Aki sees this
letter, she says its sound, (say the letter sound
three times, e.g. /d/, /d/, /d/.).’ Have Ss say the

letter sound.
3. Introduce the letter forms, i.e. capital letters and
small letters, with actions to help with
memorization.

2
[Game 1: Say it right] (More games on p.82)
1. Play a game after Ss have become familiar with
the letter name, letter sound and letter forms.

Learn the words

5
1. Have Ss listen to each target word. Explain the
meaning.
Tip: As the audio plays, point to each syllable in the
word in turn to reinforce the concept of syllables.

2. Have Ss say the words.
3. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (beginning
sound).
4. Draw Ss’ attention to the beginning sound of the
words.

38

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Letter sounds

Listen to the story

5

5

Chant and clap
syllables

5

1. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension.
Point to the relevant parts in the picture. Use
the comprehension questions as prompts.
2. Tell the story again slowly, focusing on the
target words. Guide Ss to touch their noses
or other parts of their bodies when they hear
the target words.

[Game 2: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension
questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

1. Say the chant, focusing on the beginning sound.
Ask Ss: ‘Which word begins with …?’ Click on the
target words for special effects.
2. Guide Ss to raise their hands when they hear the
target sound.
3. Say the chant again, focusing on the syllables.
Introduce the concept of syllables through
clapping and the animated purple dots.
4. Guide Ss to chant and clap together.

5
[Game 3: Let’s chant] (More games on p.83)
1. Ask Ss to choose a coloured button.
2. Demonstrate and then chant with Ss according to
the instructions, e.g. say the chant angrily.

39

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Task 1:
Trace the letters

3

1. Trace the capital letter and small letter onscreen, saying the letter name as you go.
2. Have Ss trace the letters in their books with
their fingers.
3. Ask Ss what sound these letters say.
Tip: When you elicit the letter sound, show Aki
to help Ss to differentiate it from the letter name.

5

Task 2:
Spot the letters

Say the chant

40

5

5

[Game 4: Sky-write and guess] (More games on p.84)
1. Demonstrate sky-writing and ask Ss to guess the
letter form.
2. Invite Ss to demonstrate to the class.
3. Put Ss in pairs to write on each other’s back or arm
and guess the letter form.
4. For online teaching, ask Ss to write letters on their
palms or arms. Encourage them to write on their
family members’ arms or backs after class.

1. Invite Ss to spot the target letters on-screen.
2. Have Ss complete the task in their books.
3. Ask Ss what sound these letters say.

1. Say the chant, showing the Sound Cards and
Word Cards accordingly.
2. Guide Ss to follow and repeat when they see
your hand gesture.

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Letter sounds

Task 3:
Learn more words

8

1. Review the target words. Have Ss listen for their
beginning sounds and say the words in Aki Talk
(beginning sound). Then focus on the text. Draw
Ss’ attention to the letter that says the beginning
sound in each word.
Tip: Guide Ss to hold up their magic binoculars and
spot the target letter.

2. For each of the extra words, briefly explain the
meaning first.
3. Have Ss say the word.
4. Elicit the beginning sound of the word from Ss.
5. Have Ss say the word in Aki Talk (beginning
sound).
6. Guide Ss to circle the letter that says the beginning
sound in their books.
7. Repeat steps 2-6 with all the extra words.
Tip: If time allows, review all the words with
the Word Cards. Count or indicate the
syllables of the extra words.

Wrap-up:
Say the chant again

Recap

2
1. Say the chant together to revise the target words
and/or the extra words.
2. Guide Ss to point to the words in their books as
you chant.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

41

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Rhymes (blending)

Teaching demo

Revision

Listen to the story

2

7
1. Have Ss listen to each target word. Explain the
meaning of each target word.
2. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension. Point to
the relevant parts in the pictures. Use the
comprehension questions as prompts.
3. Tell the story again slowly, focusing on the target
words. Guide Ss to touch their noses or other parts
of their bodies when they hear the target words.

3

Say the
words/sounds

42

1. Show 3-4 Word Cards one by one.
2. Have Ss say the words.
3. Have Ss say them in Aki Talk (beginning sound),
e.g. /a/, /a/, act.

[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

2
1. Have Ss listen to each target word again.
Recap the meaning.
2. Have Ss say the words.

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Rhymes (blending)

5

[Game 2: Spot the beginning sounds] & Find the
common rhyme
(More games on p.84)
1. Have Ss listen to each target word.
2. Elicit the beginning sound from Ss. Click on the hint
button to give Ss more clues if needed.

1. Have Ss listen for the rhyme in the target words.
2. Have Ss spot the rhyme in the target words.
3. Name the target rhyme. Have Ss say the rhyme, e.g.
/at/, /at/, /at/.

Task 1:
Spot the rhyme

5
1. Recap the target rhyme.
2. Have Ss listen to the words one by one. Guide
Ss to choose the words with the target rhyme.
3. Have Ss circle the answers in their books.

3

[Game 3: Can you spot the rhyme?]
(More games on p.86)
1. Say two words each time.
2. Have Ss show you a happy face if they rhyme,
and a sad face if they do not.

43

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Learn to blend
the sounds

5

1. Elicit the words from Ss.
2. Guide Ss to use Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /c/, /at/ …
/c/ - /at/, cat, while doing the blending action.
3. Practise blending again with the Sound Cards
added.

Chant and blend
the sounds

Task 2:
Blend the sounds

44

7

5

1. Say the chant, showing the Sound Cards and Word
Cards accordingly.
2. Guide Ss to follow and repeat when they see your
hand gesture.

1. Invite Ss to use Aki Talk (blending) while doing
the blending action.
2. Have Ss click on the pictures accordingly.
3. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Rhymes (blending)

Listen to the
story again

5

1. Read aloud the story, focusing on the text. Point to
each word. When it comes to a target word,
prompt Ss to say it in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cat,
/c/, /at/, cat.
2. Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after you.
3. Play the story, focusing on listening and reading.
Guide Ss to point to the words in their books
when they hear the target words.
Tip: Pointing to the words while reading is
crucial. Research shows that when children
listen to stories and see the words being
read, they learn more than if they simply
listen to the story.

Task 3:
Blend more words

Wrap-up:
Say the chant again

Recap

8
1. Have Ss use Aki Talk (blending) while doing the
blending action. Tick the words that the class can
blend.
2. Encourage Ss to do blending and tick the boxes
in their books independently.

2
1. Shuffle the Sound Cards and Word Cards to
chant in a new order.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

45

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Revision

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
My favourite story

5

1. Recap the previous rhyme stories.
2. Have Ss vote for their favourite stories.
Tip: Use items such as stickers and name cards to
avoid double-voting.

3. Based on Ss’ preference, revise the corresponding
target words of the stories one by one.
4. For each word, have Ss say it in Aki Talk (rhyme),
e.g. cat, /c/, /at/, cat. Elicit its beginning sound and
rhyme.

5
Find the
beginning sounds

10

46

[Game 1: Say the beginning sounds]
(More games on p.84)
1. Invite Ss to answer each of the questions.
2. For each question, have S listen for the
beginning sound of the word, and then choose
and say the correct beginning sound.

1. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (beginning
sound), e.g. /h/, /h/, hippo.
2. Guide them to match the words and their
corresponding beginning sounds in their books.
3. Revise the beginning sounds one by one.

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Revision

Find the rhymes

5

[Game 2: Listen for the rhymes]
(More games on p.86)
1. Place a few blue Sounds Cards (rhymes) on
the table.
2. Say a word.
3. Have Ss tap the corresponding Sound Cards.
4. For online teaching, have Ss raise their hands
or touch their noses depending on the
rhyming words they hear.

5
1. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme).
2. Guide Ss to colour the words with the same
rhyme in the same colour in their books.
3. Guide Ss to match the words and pictures in
their books.

Read the stories

I can read

8

7

1. Guide Ss to describe each of the pictures in the
story. Play the story, focusing on comprehension.
2. Read aloud the story, focusing on the text. Point
to each word. When it comes to a target word,
prompt Ss to say it in Aki Talk (rhyme).
3. Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after you.

1. Guide Ss to read the sentences. Prompt Ss to
say the target words in Aki Talk (rhyme).
2. Invite Ss to say the sentences and match them
with the correct pictures.
3. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

47

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

I can write

8

1. Show a picture from each story. Ask a question,
e.g. ‘How does Dad feel?’ and prompt Ss to
respond with the given sentence, e.g. ‘Dad is in
a bad mood.’

2. Have Ss say the missing word in Aki Talk
(rhyme).
3. Guide Ss to complete the word in their books.
Show the Sound Cards as prompts if needed.
4. Recap by having Ss read the whole sentences
aloud.

Wrap-up:
My favourite
character

48

7
1. Demonstrate how to express and elaborate your
ideas. Invite Ss to talk about their favourite
characters using a model sentence.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Have Ss draw a picture in their books and make
a recording with Oxford Reading Pen.

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Reading Fun

Lesson flow: Levels 1-2 – Reading Fun

Teaching demo

Listen to the story

10

1. Talk about the cover of the storybook. Draw Ss’
attention to the picture, title, author and
illustrator.
Tip: Explain that the author is the writer of the book,
and the illustrator is the person who drew the
pictures.

2. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension. Point
to the relevant parts in the pictures. Use the
comprehension questions as prompts.

10
[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

Say the words

15

1. For the rhyming words in red and blue, guide Ss
to use Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /n/, /et/ … /n/ /et/, net, while doing the blending action.
2. Show the rhyming words. Have Ss locate and
colour the rhyming words in their readers.
3. For the difficult words in black, guide Ss to say
the whole words.
4. Show the difficult words. Have Ss locate and
circle the difficult words in their readers.

49

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Read aloud
the story

15
1. Read the story aloud, focusing on the text. Point
to each word. Encourage Ss to try to say the
coloured words in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. net, /n/,
/et/, net, and the circled difficult words. Teach Ss
how to say sight words as they appear in the story.
Tip: For the rhyming words, show the Sound Cards as
prompts if needed. For the difficult words, use the
pictures in the worksheets as prompts if needed.

2. Read the story aloud again, focusing on oral
fluency. Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after
you.
3. Choose some scenes for acting. Have Ss mimic
actions and say the lines in appropriate tones.

Wrap-up:
Post-reading activity

50

10
1. Guide Ss to discuss the topic.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Have Ss draw a picture on their worksheets and
make a recording with Oxford Reading Pen.

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Rhymes (blending and segmenting)

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Rhymes (blending
and segmenting)

Revision

2

7
Listen to the story

3

Say the
words/sounds

2

Teaching demo
1. Put 3-6 Word Cards on the board.
2. Have Ss say the words.
3. Have Ss say them in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cap,
/c/, /ap/, cap.

1. Have Ss listen to each target word. Explain the
meaning of each target word.
2. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension. Point to
the relevant parts in the pictures. Use the
comprehension questions as prompts.
3. Tell the story again slowly, focusing on the target
words. Guide Ss to touch their noses or other parts
of their bodies when they hear the target words.

[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

1. Have Ss listen to each target word again. Recap the
meaning.
2. Have Ss say the words.

51

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

3

[Game 2: Spot the beginning sounds] & Find the
common rhyme*
(More games on p.84)
1. Have Ss listen to each target word.
2. Elicit the beginning sound from Ss. Click on the
hint button to give Ss more clues if needed.
1. Have Ss listen for the rhyme in the target words.
2. Have Ss spot the rhyme in the target words.
3. Name the target rhyme. Have Ss say the rhyme,
e.g. /ap/, /ap/, /ap/.
(*In Book 5B, Ss will be asked to spot the rhymes in
the game and find the silent letter on the next slide,
e.g. silent k in /kn/ as in ‘knee’.)

Learn to blend
the sounds

3

1. Elicit the words from Ss.
2. Guide Ss to use Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /c/,
/ap/ … /c/ - /ap/, cap, while doing the blending
action.
3. Practise blending again with the Sound Cards
added.

Task 1:
Blend the sounds
to make words

52

5

1. Invite Ss to use Aki Talk (blending) while doing
the blending action.
2. Have Ss click on the pictures accordingly.
3. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Rhymes (blending and segmenting)

Listen to the
story again

Learn to segment
the words

5

1. Read aloud the story, focusing on the text. Point
to each word. When it comes to a target word,
prompt Ss to say it in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cap,
/c/, /ap/, cap.
2. Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after you.
3. Play the story, focusing on listening and reading.
Guide Ss to point to the words in their books
when they hear the target words.

3

4
Chant and
segment the words

1. Elicit the words from Ss.
2. Guide Ss to use Aki Talk (segmenting), e.g. cap,
/c/ … /ap/, while doing the segmenting action.
3. Practise segmentation again with the Sound
Cards added.

1. Say the chant, showing the Word Cards and
Sound Cards accordingly.
2. Guide Ss to follow and repeat when they see Aki.

53

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Task 2:
Segment the words

Task 3:
Segment more
words

5
1. Invite Ss to name the pictures and use Aki Talk
(segmenting) while doing the segmenting action.
2. Have Ss click on the words accordingly.
3. Demonstrate how to segment the words into
onsets and rhymes.
4. Guide Ss to complete the task in their
books.

5
1. Have Ss listen to the words.
2. Have Ss use Aki Talk (segmenting) while doing
the segmenting action.
3. Guide Ss to cut the words into onsets and rhymes
in their books.

5

54

[Game 3: Let’s segment more words]
(More games on p.89)
1. Say a target word or an extra word (from
Task 3).
2. Have Ss use Aki Talk (segmenting) while
doing the segmenting action.
3. Have Ss pick the corresponding pink or
orange Sound Cards (onsets)*.
(*In Book 5B, Ss will be asked to pick the
blue Sound Cards (rhymes).)
4. For online teaching, have Ss show their own
Sound Cards.

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Rhymes (blending and segmenting)

Task 4:
Spell and write
the words

Wrap-up:
Say the chant again

Recap

5
1. Elicit the answers from Ss.
2. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme).
3. Guide Ss to complete the words in their
books. Show the Sound Cards as prompts if
needed.

2
1. Shuffle the Word Cards and Sound Cards
to chant in a new order.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

55

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Level 5 (Book 5C) – Rhymes
(disyllabic words)

2

Revision

Teaching demo

Listen to the story &
[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]

7
3

Say the words/sounds

Clap the syllables

Task 1:
Join the syllables
to make words

56

2

5

2

1. Focus on the sound. Have Ss listen to each
target word and clap the syllables.
2. Focus on the text. Have Ss point to the
purple dots as they say the disyllabic words,
aiming to reinforce Ss’ syllable awareness.

1. Have Ss point to the individual syllables as they
say the disyllabic words, aiming to develop Ss’
awareness of syllable division patterns.
2. Have Ss click on the pictures accordingly.
3. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

Lesson flow: Level 5 (Book 5C) – Rhymes (disyllabic words)

Try to blend
the syllables

10

1. For each target word, show where the two syllables break.
2. Have Ss say each syllable in Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /pr/,
/on/ … /pr/ - /on/, pron.
3. Encourage Ss to blend the two syllables into a word. Ask
them if it sounds right.

1. Have Ss compare the version they have just sounded out
with the correct version. Exaggerate the difference to
introduce the concept of stress.
2. Guide Ss to highlight the difference in stress by clapping
hands: clap loudly for a strong syllable and softly for a
weak syllable.

Say them right

Tip: Explain the rule: when we blend two syllables into a word,
there is always a weaker syllable; we say this syllable softly.

3. Guide Ss to say the word correctly. Show your left fist and
stress the first syllable, e.g. a; and then show your right
fist and stress the second syllable, e.g. pron. Join the fists
together to elicit the correct pronunciation, e.g. apron.

3

[Game 2: Listen to the syllables]
(More games on p.90)
1. Invite Ss to answer each of the questions.
2. For each question, have S listen to the syllables
carefully and then choose and say the correct version.

Listen to the story again

5

When it comes to a target word, prompt Ss to say it
and then clap loudly for its strong syllable and softly
for its weak syllable.
Tip: For more able Ss, encourage them to read the whole
sentences directly or with the aid of the 5 reading steps (p.16).

Task 2:
Complete the words

5

1. Elicit the words from Ss.
2. Tell Ss to identify the strong syllables and weak syllables
of the words.
3. Focus on the strong syllables. have Ss say them in Aki
Talk (rhyme), e,g. ba, /b/, /a/, ba.
4. Guide Ss to write the strong syllables
within the coloured boxes and then
circle the weak syllables in their
books. Show the Sound Cards as
prompts if needed.

57

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Task 3:
Say more words

8

1. For each extra word, show where the two syllables break.
2. Guide Ss to say the first syllable and the second syllable
through Aki Talk (blending) or modelling.
Tip: For more able Ss, encourage them to divide the word and
say both syllables in Aki Talk (blending).

3. Guide Ss to blend the two syllables into a word. Stress
both syllables while showing your fists. Join the fists
together to elicit or model the correct pronunciation.
4. Have Ss say the words correctly.
5. Guide Ss to colour the strong
syllables and circle the weak
syllables in their books.

5
Task 4:
Spell and write the words

Wrap-up:
Listen for the
target sounds

Recap

58

Before writing the answers, prompt Ss to
clap loudly for the strong syllables and
softly for the weak syllables to reinforce
syllable awareness and the concept of
stress.

2
1. Say the target words, extra words and some other words
at random.
2. Have Ss show the corresponding Sound Cards when they
can hear the target sound.

1

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 - Revision

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Revision

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
Which is which?

7

3
Find the
rhyming words/
Find the same sounds

5

1. Ask questions to refresh Ss’ memory. Invite Ss to
choose the correct stories.
2. Revise the corresponding target words of the stories
one by one.
3. For each word, have Ss say it in Aki Talk (rhyme)*,
e.g. cap, /c/, /ap/, cap. Elicit its beginning sound and
rhyme.
(*For disyllabic words in Book 5C, have Ss say the
words as a whole. Remind them that one syllable is
strong and another one is weak. If needed, guide Ss
to say each syllable in Aki Talk as revision.)

[Game 1: Say the rhymes/words]
(More games on p.86)
1. Invite Ss to answer each of the questions.
2. For each question, have S choose the word with
the corresponding rhyme and say it in Aki Talk
(rhyme)*.
(*For disyllabic words in Book 5C, have Ss say the
words as a whole.)

1. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme) and
click on the pairs that share the same rhyme, onset
or syllable.
2. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

59

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Spell the words

5

[Game 2: Tap the cards]
(More games on p.89)
1. Put a few Sound Cards on the table according to
the game instructions.
2. Say a word.
3. Have Ss tap the corresponding Sound Cards.
Encourage Ss to say the word in Aki Talk
(rhyme) and spell it out, e.g. cap, /c/, /ap/, c-a-p.
4. Change the Sound Cards and repeat the game.
5. For online teaching, have Ss choose one of the
Word Cards [with the words covered]. Then say
the word in Aki Talk (rhyme) and spell it out.

5
1. Elicit the answers from Ss.
2. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme)*.
3. Guide Ss to complete the words in their books.
Show the Sound Cards as prompts if needed.
(*For disyllabic words in Book 5C, have Ss say
them and clap the syllables before writing.)

I can read

15
1. Demonstrate how to read the sentences using the
5 reading steps (p.16). Encourage Ss to try on
their own.
Tips: For difficult words and sight words, guide Ss to
repeat after you or have Ss refer to the sight word
poster.

2. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions
and complete the task in their books.

60

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 - Revision

Learn to write

I can write

5

12

1. Guide Ss to notice the writing convention
used in the given sentences: what or how it is
used.
2. Guide Ss to complete the task in their books.

1. Have Ss listen carefully and write the sentences
in their books. Demonstrate how to write the
sentence using the 5 writing steps (p.16).
Encourage Ss to try on their own.
2. Have Ss say and write their own sentences in
their books. Encourage Ss to use the 5 writing
steps. Provide examples and prompts as needed.
Tip: Elicit ideas from Ss, using the target words
previously learnt as prompts. For difficult words
and sight words, write them on the board or have
Ss refer to the sight word poster.

Wrap-up:
Read aloud our
sentences

3

1. Invite Ss to read aloud their sentences to the
class or write them on the board.
2. Guide the other Ss to do actions or give
replies accordingly.

61

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 1

Teaching demo

(Level 4 only)
Can you try?

Listen to the story

1. Introduce similar-sounding rhymes to prepare Ss
for reading Level 4 readers.
2. Draw Ss’ attention to the letters of these similarsounding rhymes.
3. Briefly explain the phonics rules of the target
orthographic syllable type.
4. Guide Ss to blend the sounds to make more
words.

13
1. Talk about the cover of the reader. Draw Ss’
attention to the picture, title, author and
illustrator.
2. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension.
Point to the relevant parts in the pictures. Use
the comprehension questions as prompts.

10

62

[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 1

Say the words

12

1. For the rhyming words in red and blue, guide Ss
to use Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /r/, /at/ … /r/ - /at/,
rat, while doing the blending action.
2. Show the rhyming words. Have Ss locate and
colour the rhyming words in their readers.
3. For the difficult words in black, guide Ss to say
the whole words.
4. Show the difficult words. Have Ss locate and
circle the difficult words in their readers.

Learn the
sight words

7
1. For the sight words, invite Ss to spot and say
the whole words.
2. Show the sight words. Have Ss locate and
underline the sight words that they find difficult
in their readers.

Read aloud
the story

13

1. Read the story aloud, focusing on the text. Point to
each word. Demonstrate and guide Ss to read the
target sentences (see ‘Read in 5 Steps’ in Reading
Fun 2) using the 5 reading steps (p.16).

2. Read the story aloud again, focusing on oral fluency.
Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after you.

Wrap-up:
My mini-dictionary

5

1. Encourage Ss to say a word that they want to
keep in their mini-dictionaries.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Write the words on the board. If time allows,
have Ss copy the words on their worksheets.

63

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 2

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
Recap the story

Listen to the story

2

1. Recap the story. Ask a few comprehension questions
to refresh Ss’ memory.

13
1. Play the story, focusing on comprehension.
Alternatively, use the ‘jump-in’ reading
approach for more interaction: when the T
pauses, Ss have to ‘jump in’ and read the word.
The T should pause at words that Ss are familiar
with.
2. Choose some scenes for acting. Ask Ss to mimic
actions and say the lines in appropriate tones.

5

[Game 1: Choose the correct pictures]
1. Encourage Ss to try to look at the sentences
(taken from ‘Read in 5 steps’) first. Then play the
sentences.
2. Have Ss choose the correct pictures.
Tip: At this stage, Ss are still learning to read. Praise
Ss if they are able to work out the meaning of the
sentences without listening to the audio.

64

Lesson flow: Levels 3-5 – Reading Fun 2

List of sight
words and
difficult words

3

1. Practise saying the sight words and difficult
words.
Tip: To improve Ss’ reading fluency, it is important to
revise these sight words and difficult words as they
will appear in the target sentences in ‘Read in 5
steps’. (Note that some of these sight words are not
included in Worksheet 1 but are introduced in
previous units.)

5

[Game 2: Flashcard challenge]
(Search ‘sight word activities’ online for more ideas.)
1. Show the flashcards. Have Ss say the words.
Tip: Increase the speed as Ss get familiar with these
sight words.

Read in 5 steps

12
1. Encourage Ss to read the target sentences using
the 5 reading steps (p.16) on their own.

2. Have Ss read the sentences to their partners.

65

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Reading
comprehension

10
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension
questions.
2. For gap-filling exercises, elicit the answers from
Ss. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme)
and then spell them out. Show the Sound Cards
as prompts if needed.
3. Guide Ss to complete the task on their
worksheets.

Story map

Wrap-up:
Post-reading activity

66

7
1. Guide Ss to identify the story elements, such
as the setting (time and place) and characters.

3
1. Guide Ss to discuss the topic.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Have Ss draw a picture on their worksheets
and make a recording with Oxford Reading
Pen.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 1 & 3

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 1 & 3

Teaching demo

Listen to
the reader

13
1. Talk about the cover of the reader. Draw Ss’
attention to the picture, title, author and
illustrator.
2. Tell the story, focusing on comprehension.
Point to the relevant parts in the pictures. Use
the comprehension questions as prompts.

10
[Game 1: Comprehension challenge]
(More games on p.83)
1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension questions.
2. Model the complete answers.

Say the words

12

1. For the rhyming words in red and blue, guide Ss to
use Aki Talk (blending), e.g. /ch/, /at/ … /ch/ - /at/,
chat, while doing the blending action.
2. For the disyllabic words in purple, guide Ss to say
each syllable in Aki Talk (blending) and then blend
their syllables into words, e.g. /l/, /ight/ … /l/ /ight/, light; /n/, /ing/, /n/ - /ing/, ning; lightning.
3. Show the rhyming words and disyllabic words.
Have Ss locate and colour the rhyming words and
disyllabic words in their readers.
4. For the difficult words in black, guide Ss
to say the whole words.
5. Show the difficult words. Have Ss locate
and circle the difficult words in their
readers.

67

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Learn the
sight words

10
1. For the sight words, invite Ss to spot and say
the whole words.
2. Show the sight words. Have Ss locate and
underline the sight words that they find difficult
in their readers.

12
Read in 5 steps

1. Encourage Ss to read the target sentences using
the 5 reading steps (p.16) on their own.

2. Have Ss read the sentences to their partners.

Wrap-up:
My favourite part

Recap

68

2

1. Encourage Ss to talk about which part of the
book/poem they like best.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
If time allows, have Ss copy the sentences
from the book/poem in their books.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 2 & 4

//

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 2 & 4

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
Review the reader

Review the words

2
1. Recap the story. Ask a few comprehension questions
to refresh Ss’ memory.

5

1. Review the target rhyming words, disyllabic words
and difficult words.
2. Review the sight words too.

Read aloud
the reader

3

13

[Game 1: Find the missing sentences]
1. Encourage Ss to read the sentences (taken from
‘Read in 5 steps’) with the aid of the 5 reading
steps (p.16).
2. Tell Ss to choose the sentences that fit into the
blanks.

1. Read the reader aloud, focusing on the text. Point to
each word. When it comes to the target sentences,
encourage Ss to read them using the 5 reading steps
independently.

2. Read the reader aloud again, focusing on oral fluency.
Have Ss repeat the whole sentences after you.

69

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

20
Reading
comprehension

1. Guide Ss to answer the comprehension
questions.
2. For gap-filling exercises, elicit the answers from
Ss. Have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme)
and then spell them out. Show the Sound Cards
as prompts if needed.
3. Guide Ss to complete the tasks in
their books.

Learn the
text type

5

1. To raise Ss’ awareness about the text being
read, tell Ss: ‘We are reading (text type). What
is special about it?’

2. Briefly explain the communicative purposes
and distinctive features of the text type.

3

70

[Game 2: Text type challenge]
1. Read the rubrics. Guide Ss to click on the
corresponding features.
2. If time allows, encourage Ss to look for the
corresponding features in other parts of the reader.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Reading Fun 2 & 4

Spot the features

5
1. Apart from distinctive features, encourage Ss to
spot other generic features of the reader being
read and make a comparison with another reader.
2. Guide Ss to tick the corresponding features in
their books.

Wrap-up:
Post-reading activity

Recap

3
1. Guide Ss to discuss the topic.
2. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Have Ss draw a picture in their books and
make a recording with Oxford Reading Pen.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

71

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 1

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
My favourite reader

Listen to
the readers

Review and
compare

72

5

15

12

1. Invite Ss to share their views on the readers based
on ‘Homework: My reading journal’.
2. Have Ss vote for their favourite readers.

1. Based on Ss’ preference, revise the corresponding
readers one by one.
2. Play the audio, focusing on comprehension.
Alternatively, use the ‘jump-in’ reading
approach for more interaction: when the T
pauses, Ss have to ‘jump in’ and read the word.
The T should pause at words that Ss are familiar
with.
3. Choose some scenes for acting. Ask Ss to mimic
actions and say the lines in appropriate tones.

1. Guide Ss to review and compare the two readers
using the 5W1H questions provided.
2. Guide Ss to write the answers in their books.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 1

Grammar in use 20

1. Introduce the grammatical structures in terms of
form, meaning and use with the aid of the teaching
notes on the slides.
Tip: It is advisable to provide contexts and use
prompt questions to facilitate Ss’ understanding.

Grammar practice

1. Guide Ss to complete the grammar tasks in
their books with the aid of the teaching notes
on the slides.

2

Wrap up:
Grammar revision

Recap

5

1

[Game 1: I can make sentences]
1. Have Ss choose a coloured button.
2. Provide a context. Invite Ss to make sentences
using the target grammatical structures.

1. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Guide Ss to complete part of the homework in their
books during class.

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

73

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 2 & 3

Teaching demo

Warm-up:
Grammar for
writing

Learn the
text type

2

1. Review the grammar notes.
2. Focus on the meaning and use. Ask Ss prompt
questions and guide Ss to say the example
sentences.
3. Focus on the form. Encourage Ss to click on target
sentence structures for special effects.

5
1. To raise Ss’ awareness about the text type to
be written, tell Ss: ‘This is called (text type).
What is special about it? We are going to write
one too.’

2. Briefly explain the communicative purposes
and distinctive features of the text type.

3

74

[Game 1: Text type challenge]
1. Read the rubrics. Guide Ss to click on the
corresponding features.
2. If time allows, show Ss the corresponding
features in other readers or materials.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 2 & 3

Pre-writing task

Useful words for
guided writing

Guided writing

5
1. Guide Ss to complete the pre-writing task in their
books.
2. To better prepare Ss for the guided writing tasks,
recap the distinctive features of the text types and
encourage Ss to read the completed tasks aloud.

5
1. Show the rubrics of the guided writing task to be
written.
2. Introduce useful words to build vocabulary and
ideas for writing.

20

1. Guide Ss to brainstorm ideas with the aid of the
useful words.
2. Encourage Ss to draw their ideas in their books.
3. Guide Ss to complete the guided writing task in
their books using the prompt questions.
Encourage Ss to write the sentences with the
aid of the 5 writing steps (p.16).
Tip: If needed, show Ss the suggested answers as
a model for writing.

75

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

2
Self-assessment

Show-and-tell

Peer assessment

76

1. Encourage Ss to reflect on their own work
according to the descriptors.
2. Have Ss tick the boxes as appropriate in their
books.

10

2

1. Demonstrate how to do the show-and-tell. Also,
take the chance to teach the manners expected of
presenters and listeners.
2. Invite Ss to do the show-and-tell about their
completed guided writing tasks.

1. Guide Ss to assess the performance of one of their
classmates according to the descriptors.
Encourage Ss to focus on what they can learn
from others.
2. Have Ss tick the boxes as appropriate in their
books.

Lesson flow: Level 6 – Writing Fun 2 & 3

Wrap up:
Extended writing

Recap

5
1. (Assign the task as classwork or homework.)
Guide Ss to complete part of the homework in their
books during class.

1

1. Remind Ss to complete their homework.
2. Quickly go through the learnt items and
skills together.
3. Have Ss fill in the star for that unit.

77

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Pronunciation points to note
Consonants (Levels 1-2)
Unit

Sound

Points to note

2

d

Guide Ss to put the tips of their tongues behind their top front teeth before they
say the letter sound /d/. Ask them to touch the back of their top front teeth hard
using the tips of their tongues and then lower their tongues to say the letter
sound.

3

m

Ask Ss to close their lips tightly and put their fingers on their throats to feel the
vibration when they say the letter sound /m/.

4

b

Ask Ss to close their lips tightly before saying the letter sound /b/. Ask them to
look in the mirror and make sure they can hardly see their lips when saying the
letter sound.

6

t

Ask Ss to use the tips of their tongues to touch the back of their upper front
teeth when they say the letter sound /t/. Ask them to put their hands in front of
their mouths to feel the quick puff of air released from their mouths.

7

h

Ask Ss to place their hands in front of their mouths when they say the letter
sound /h/ to feel the puff of air. Ask them to hold some tissue paper in front of
their mouths when they say the letter sound and see how much the puff of air
blows the tissue.

8

Tell Ss that the letter k and the letter c make the same sound.

9

f

Ask Ss to put their upper front teeth on their lower lips before saying the letter
sound /f/. Ask them to place their hands in front of their mouths when they say
the letter sound /f/ to feel the flow of air.

13

n

Ask Ss to open their mouths and use the tips of their tongues to touch the back
of their upper front teeth when they say the letter sound /n/. Ask Ss to put their
fingers on their noses to feel the vibration when they say the letter sound.

14

p

Ask Ss to close their lips gently before they say the letter sound /p/. Ask them to
put their hands in front of their mouths as they open their lips quickly to release
a puff of air. They will be able to feel the puff of air on their hands.

15

k

Ask Ss to use the tips of their tongues to touch the back of their lower front
teeth when they say the letter sound /k/. Ask Ss to also place their hands in front
of their mouths. They should feel the puff of air when saying the sound.

17

78

c

l

Ask Ss to open their mouths and hide their tongues behind their upper front
teeth before they say the letter sound /l/.

When teaching a consonant or a consonant cluster,
remember to use ‘pure sounds’ without adding an intrusive
schwa (e.g. /m/ is pronounced as ‘mmm’ instead of ‘muh’).

Unit

Sound

Points to note

18

g

When saying the letter sound /g/, the puff of air comes from the throat and
is also weaker. Ask them to put their fingers on their throats to feel the
vibration when they say the letter sound /g/.

19

w

Ask Ss to look in a mirror and round their mouths with their teeth opened
when they say the letter sound /w/.

24

j

Ask Ss to look in the mirror when they say the letter sound /j/. Ask them to
close their teeth and round their lips as if giving a kiss.

28

s

Ask Ss to spread their lips, close their teeth, and raise their tongues when
saying the letter sound /s/.

29

r

Ask Ss to look in the mirror. Ask them to round their lips and curl their
tongues when they say the letter sound /r/.

34

q

The ‘q’ alone is pronounced the same as the sound /k/. However, an initial
‘q’ is commonly followed by a ‘u’ in English. Therefore, when we say a
word starting with a ‘q’, we almost always round our lips to pronounce /u/
immediately after /q/, resulting in the sound /qu/ (IPA: [kw]). (Exceptions
are words of foreign origins, e.g. ‘queue’.)

37

y

Ask Ss to look in a mirror. Ask them to spread their lips and close their
teeth when they say the letter sound /y/.

38

v

Ask Ss to say the letter sound /f/. Tell Ss the letter sound /v/ is similar to the
letter sound /f/. Ask them to bite their lower lips a bit harder when saying
the letter sound /v/. The letter sound /v/ is more forceful than the letter
sound /f/. Ask them to put their fingers on their throats to feel the vibration
when they say the letter sound /v/.

40

z

Guide Ss to spread their lips, close their teeth and say the letter sound /s/.
Ask them to close their teeth tighter when they say the letter sound /z/. The
letter sound /z/ is more forceful than the letter sound /s/.

41

x

Ask Ss to say the letter sounds /k/ and /s/ quickly. Tell them that the letter
sounds /k/ and /s/ form the letter sound /x/.

79

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Consonant clusters (Levels 3-5)
A consonant cluster is a group of consonants that appear together in a word. Say one sound after
the other very quickly to blend the sounds together.
cl
sn
sk

tw
st
pr

sp
thr
br

bl
tr
fr

dr
gl

cr
fl

sm
pl

sw
str

Digraphs (Levels 3-5)
A digraph is one sound represented by two letters, e.g. /sh/, /ch/, /th/, /ph/.

Short vowels (Levels 1-2)
Unit

Sound

Points to note

1

a

Ask Ss to open their mouths wide and drop their lower jaws when they say the
letter sound /a/. Ask them to watch their lower jaws moving down when
saying the letter sound.

12

e

Ask Ss to open their lips and teeth and smile when they say the letter sound
/e/. The letter sounds /a/ and /e/ may sound similar to some children. Draw
Ss’s attention to your mouth when you say the two letter sounds. When saying
the letter sound /a/, the lower jaw moves down. When saying the letter sound
/e/, the lips move sideways.

23

o

Ask Ss to look in a mirror and slightly round their mouths when they say the
letter sound /o/.

27

u

Ask Ss to open their mouths slightly when saying the letter sound /u/. It is a
‘weak’ vowel in the sense that it only makes a slight sound in their throats.

33

i

Ask Ss to touch the back of their lower teeth with their tongues when they say
the letter sound /i/.

Syllable stress (Level 5 – Book 5C)
In a disyllabic or multisyllabic word, the stress falls on one of the syllables. As the term and the
concept of stress is too advanced for children at this stage, we use ‘strong syllables’ and ‘weak
syllables’, together with the action of clapping, to illustrate the idea of ‘stressed syllables’ and
‘unstressed syllables’. When children are ready to blend two syllables into a word, teachers can
join the fists together as a visual hint and remind them that one is a strong syllable and another one
is a weak syllable.. There is no need to explain the rules of different stress patterns or introduce the
different vowels (e.g. [ə] as in ‘roman’, [ɪ] as in ‘basic’) that may occur in an unstressed syllable.

80

Oral motor development exercises

[Foundation Year 1] Level 1

[Foundation Year 1] Level 2

Material

Unit

Sound

Material

Unit

Sound

Book 1A

2

d

Book 2A

24

j

4

b

28

s

9

f

29

r

17

l

38

v

40

z

41

x

Book 1B

Book 2B

81

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Game ideas
Recognizing letter names and letter sounds (Levels 1-2)
Point and say
1. Prepare some cards marked with the target letter only, and some with the target letter and
Aki. Put them up on the wall.
2. Elicit a letter name or a letter sound by saying the instruction: ‘Show me …’
3. Have Ss point to the card, and then say the letter name or letter sound accordingly.
Show me the
letter sound /a/.
/a/

Pick and say
1. Prepare some cards marked with the target letter only, and some with the target letter and
Aki. Put them face down in a pile.
2. Have Ss pick a card in turn and say the letter name or letter sound accordingly.
/a/

Goodbye, letters!
1. Write different letters previously learnt on the board.
2. Say an instruction: ‘Say goodbye to …’
3. Invite Ss to erase the corresponding letter and say goodbye to it.
Say goodbye to
capital letter b.

Goodbye,
capital letter b.
a
b

82

A
B

D
a

Listening comprehension (Levels 1-6)

Answers and rewards
1. Create a scenario; draw a house, a toy shop, a cake or anything that captures Ss’ interest on
the board.
2. Ask a comprehension question.
3. For each correct answer, give Ss a chance to say what they
want to add to the picture, e.g. by drawing a ‘swimming pool’
outside the house or a ‘robot’ in the toy shop. This helps to
enhance Ss’ vocabulary skills and creativity.
4. Draw the items accordingly. Praise Ss for their input.
Variation: The game can be played between two teams as a competition.

True or false
1. Rephrase a comprehension question as a statement.
2. Have Ss answer ‘true’ or ‘false’ and do actions accordingly. Demonstrate how to use their
arms to make a circle for a true statement and a cross for a false statement.

True.

False.

Story chants (Levels 1-2)

I can chant
1. Encourage Ss to suggest different ways of saying the chant, e.g. quickly, happily and like
an elderly person. This is suitable for a more able class.
2. Say the chant accordingly.
Chant in story time
1. Expand or adapt the story to create a new storyline, e.g. It’s getting late now. Tina Turtle is
tired.
2. Ask Ss how the chant should be read to match the context.
3. Say the chant accordingly.

83

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Letter formation (Levels 1-2)

Musical letters
1. Arrange chairs in a circle. Put up a piece of paper marked with a
letter on each chair.
2. Play the music and have Ss march around. When the music stops,
have Ss go to the nearest chairs.
3. Have Ss trace the corresponding letters with their fingers. They can
sit down when finished.
Multisensory writing practice
1. Prepare magnetic drawing boards or trays covered with flour for Ss.
2. Encourage Ss to practise writing letters with their fingers.
Beginning sound/onset awareness (Levels 1-5)

Talking Sound Cards
1. Place 2-4 pink or orange Sound Cards (onsets) on the table.
2. Say a word.
3. Invite Ss to touch each Sound Card with Oxford Reading Pen and then pick the
corresponding Sound Card. (Alternatively, the T can hold Oxford Reading Pen.)
4. Guide Ss to say the word in Aki Talk (beginning sound).
/c/, /c/, cat

cat

c
h

d

f

Match the sounds
1. Put up 2-4 pink or orange Sound Cards (onsets) on the wall. Hand a few Word Cards to Ss.
2. Guide Ss to say the words in Aki Talk (beginning sound).
3. Have Ss stick each of the Word Cards below the corresponding Sound Card.

f

c
cat

84

h
/c/, /c/, cat

I spy
1. Put up 3-4 Word Cards on the wall.
2. Elicit a word by saying the instruction: ‘I spy with my little eye a word beginning with …’
3. Have Ss point to the corresponding Word Card.
4. Guide Ss to say the word in Aki Talk (beginning sound).
I spy with my little
eye a word
beginning with /c/.

act

jump

cat

dog
/c/, /c/, cat

Slap the words
1.
2.
3.
4.

Place 3-4 Word Cards [with the words covered] on the table.
Show a pink or orange Sound Card (onset).
Have Ss tap the corresponding Word Card.
Guide Ss to say the word in Aki Talk (beginning sound).
/c/, /c/, cat

c
hat

cat

fat

Say it quick
1. Prepare 3-4 pink or orange Sound Cards (onsets). Hold them in a pile
in front of Ss.
2. Flip through the cards. Have Ss say the sound as they see it.
3. Speed up, slow down, or randomly insert silly cards to increase
difficulty.
Variation: For a more able class, encourage Ss to think of a word with the
corresponding beginning sound and say it as quickly as possible.

Tip: After you teach how to blend onsets and rhymes to form words, you may adapt some of the games and
have Ss say the words in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cat, /c/, /at/, cat, so as to reinforce their onset and rhyme
awareness simultaneously.

85

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Rhyme awareness (Levels 1-5)

Nod if it rhymes
Have Ss listen to what you say and answer whether the words contain a particular rhyme.
e.g. Tell Ss: ‘Listen to the following words. Do they have the rhyme -at?’
2. Say a word.
3. If the word contains the target rhyme, have Ss nod their heads.
4. Repeat Steps 2-3. Speed up as Ss get familiar with the game.
1.

cat

Memory match
1. Place 4-8 Word Cards face down on the table.
2. Invite Ss to flip any two cards over and say the words accordingly. If applicable, have Ss
say the word in Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cat, /c/, /at/, cat.
3. Ss can take both cards if they rhyme. The S with most cards wins the game.

cat

fat

cat, /c/, /at/, cat
fat, /f/, /at/, fat

Say a rhyming word
1. Have Ss sit in a circle. Play music and have Ss pass the paper figure of Aki around.
2. Stop the music at random. Elicit a rhyming word from the S holding the paper figure. Ask:
‘Can you say a word with the rhyme …?’

3. Make sure all Ss have a chance to say a rhyming word. If applicable, have Ss say the
words in Aki Talk (rhyme).
Can you say a word
with the rhyme -at?

86

hat, /h/, /at/, hat

Sorting fun
1. Draw 2-4 houses and stick a blue Sound Card (rhyme) on the top of each house.
2. Say a word and show the corresponding Word Card.
3. Invite Ss to stick the Word Card on the correct house. If applicable, have him/her say the
word in Aki Talk (rhyme).
cat, /c/, /at/, cat

cat

at

en

cat

Lucky draw
1. Put a number of Word Cards (including previously learnt words) in a bag. Invite Ss to take
a card from the bag in turn.
2. Have Ss say the word accordingly.
3. Elicit a rhyming word from Ss. Ask: ‘Can you say a word that rhymes with …?’
Yes, it is ‘hen’.
Can you say a word
that rhymes with ‘hen’?

ten

hen

The collector
1. Prepare some blue Sound Cards (rhymes). Hand a pile of 5-6 cards to each S.
2. Pretend to be a collector. Elicit a rhyme by saying the instruction: ‘I want to collect the
rhyme of the word …’

3. Have Ss give out the corresponding cards if they have them. If applicable, guide Ss to say
the words in Aki Talk (rhyme).
4. The winner will be the first S to hand all his/her cards to the T.
cat, /c/, /at/, cat

I want to collect the
rhyme of the word
‘cat’.
at

Tip: After you teach how to blend onsets and rhymes to form words, you may guide Ss to say the words in
Aki Talk (rhyme), e.g. cat, /c/, /at/, cat. Also, these games can be adapted to practise two or more rhymes
for revision.

87

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Blending skills (Levels 1-5)

Blend the sounds
1. Place the Sound Cards face down in two separate piles, i.e.
onsets and rhymes, on the table.
2. Invite Ss to flip over the first card in each pile.
3. Guide Ss to blend the onset and rhyme using Aki Talk
(blending), e.g. /c/, /at/ … /c/ - /at/, cat. The word can be a
real word or a pseudo-word; remind Ss if it is a pseudoword.

/c/, /at/ … /c/ - /at/, cat

c

at

Variation: The game can be played between two teams as a
competition. Also, the two piles of Sound Cards can be replaced with
two blending dice.

Find your partner
1. Prepare several identical sets of the Sound Cards. Hand each of them to Ss at random, e.g.
three Ss are holding the pink Sound Card /c/ and three other Ss are holding the blue Sound
Cards /at/.
2. Show a Word Card [with the word covered].
3. Have Ss look for the other Ss with a Sound Card that can make the corresponding word.
4. Ss in pairs should go to the T to blend the onset and rhyme using Aki Talk (blending). The
first team will collect the Word Card.
Variation: Have Ss in pairs step into a hula hoop and blend the sounds together.

/c/, /at/ … /c/ - /at/, cat
cat

c

at

Make a word
1. Put up 2-3 blue Sound Cards (rhymes) and their
corresponding Word Cards [with the words
covered] on the board. Also, place 2-4 pink or
orange Sound Cards (onset) on the table.
2. Invite Ss to choose any Sound Cards in order to
make a meaningful word as displayed. Guide Ss
to blend the onset and rhyme using Aki Talk
(blending).
3. Remove the cover on the Word Card to check the
answer.
Variation: The game can be played between two teams as
a competition.

88

cat

c

h

p

ten

pen

at en

hat

t

Segmenting skills (Levels 3-5)

Segmentation buddy
1. Prepare some pieces of paper each marked with a letter. Hand a piece of paper to each S.
2. Say a word.
3. Have Ss with the corresponding letters come forwards and form the word, each holding the
paper.
4. Invite Ss to segment the word by ‘cutting’ it in the correct place.
5. Guide Ss to segment the word using Aki Talk (segmenting), e.g. clap, /cl/ … /ap/.
Variation: You may use the Sounds Cards (e.g. cl, ap) to make the game easier.

clap

l

c

a

p
clap, /cl/ … /ap/

Pick and segment
1. Prepare the Word Cards, some of which have a picture of Aki on them. Put them face
down in a pile.
2. Have Ss pick a card in turn. If Aki is not shown, Ss should say the whole word. If Aki is
shown, Ss should segment the word using Aki Talk (segmenting).
gap, /g/ … /ap/

I can spell
1.
2.
3.
4.

Prepare a few Word Cards [with the words covered] and the corresponding Sound Cards.
Show a Word Card.
Invite Ss to name the picture and segment the word using Aki Talk (segmenting).
Guide Ss to find the corresponding Sound Cards, put them together and spell the word.

gap, /g/ … /ap/…
g-a-p

gap

g

ap

89

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Syllable stress (Level 5 – Book 5C)

Fold and clip
1. Prepare a few cards each with a disyllabic word written on them.
2. Say a word. Hand the corresponding card and a clothes peg to one of the Ss.
3. Invite the S to fold the card to show where the syllables break, and to use the clothes peg to
indicate the strong syllable.
4. Ask the S to hold up the folded card and say the word with the correct stress pattern. Have
other Ss say the word together.
basin

basin

basin

Match the syllables
1. Write the syllables of each of the disyllabic words on cards. Place them at random on the
table. Prepare some big magnets and small magnets too.
2. Invite Ss to form the correct words by putting up the syllable cards together on the board.
3. Have Ss place a big magnet and a small magnet underneath the syllable cards to indicate
the strong syllable and weak syllable. Have Ss say the words with the correct stress pattern.

ra

raven

ven

Slap or tap
1. Stick some syllable cards (which can be reused from the above game) in a grid pattern on
the board.
2. Say a word.
3. Invite Ss to touch the corresponding syllable cards. To make it more fun, have Ss slap the
cards representing strong syllables firmly and tap the cards representing soft syllables
lightly. Have Ss say the words with the correct stress pattern.

90

ba

a

o

ro

pen

bacon

sin

con

bot

More chants for practice
Spelling chants (demo)

Which letter says /c/?
c’, ‘c’. Letter ‘c’.
c’, ‘c’. Letter ‘c’.
c’, ‘c’. Letter ‘c’.

Which letters say /ap/?
‘ap’, ‘ap’, ‘ap’, /ap/.
‘ap’, ‘ap’, ‘ap’, /ap/.
‘ap’, ‘ap’, ‘ap’, /ap/.

Now it is time to spell.
/c/, c, /ap,/ a-p , c-a-p.
/c/, c, /ap/, a-p , c-a-p.
/c/, c, /ap/, a-p , c-a-p.

Change the sounds and words.
Say the chant again.

91

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Story chants

[Foundation Year 2] Level 3
Material

Unit

Rhyme

Story chant

Book 3A

46

-ap

Clap, clap, clap your hands.
Tap, tap, tap your feet.
Put on your cap,
And don’t jump over the gap.

47

-ig

A great big fig,
A great big fig.
Gary Goat wants to dig.
He thinks a twig will help him out,
But it is a snake without a doubt!

48

-ell

A bell and a shell,
For show-and-tell.
A bird that can spell.
All the children yell.

49

-ock

Santa, Santa opens a lock.
Santa, Santa sees a sock.
Santa, Santa steps on a block,
And bumps into a clock.

Book 3B

53

-op

I can mop, mop, mop.
I can hop, hop, hop.
I can chop, chop, chop.
Oh no! Stop!

54

-ack

Zack Zebra wants to pack,
Pack his suitcase which is black.
Oh no! There is a crack.
Now he has to use a sack.

55

-est

Run, run, then take a rest.
Something drops onto Martin’s chest.
A baby bird fell out of the nest.
Put it back. You are the best!

56

92

-ink

Pink drink, pink drink
in a sink.
Try some, try some.
What do you think?

Material

Unit

Rhyme

Story chant

Book 3C

60

-ip

Quick, quick! Open the zip.
Dip, dip, dip the chip.
Yummy, yummy.
Lick your lip.

61

-all

Katie Koala has a ball.
The ball, the ball is very small.
Katie gets the ball off the wall.
Watch out, watch out, don’t fall!

62

-ing

The king, the king can’t find his ring.
The princess says, ‘Dad, let me sing.’
Then she says, ‘Let me make you a ring.’
Now what do they see shining on the swing?

63

-uck

Quack, quack.
Cluck, cluck, cluck.
Some chicks and some ducks had good luck.
A truck was driving by with a load
And stopped for them to cross the road.

93

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Foundation Year 2] Level 4
Material

Unit

Rhyme

Story chant

Book 4A

67

-ake

Shake and shake, shake and shake,
Get ready to bake a cake.
Oh no! I see a snake!
Wake up, you silly snake!

68

-ine

Nine little porcupines see a vine.
One little porcupine draws a line.
Pull, pull. One, two, three.
Some little porcupines in the pine tree.

69

-one

Timmy sees a bone, bone, bone.
He digs with a stone, stone, stone.
Dad shouts on the phone, phone, phone.
He marks the spot with a cone, cone, cone.

Book 4B

73

-ee

Bobby, Bobby, Bee, Bee, Bee
Is flying to a very big tree.
On the way who does he see?
Three bees waiting for tea!

74

-ie

Baking, baking an apple pie.
Grandma’s tired, down she’ll lie.
What is this tie doing on the floor?
Dad’s eating the pie behind the door!

75

Let’s play a game. I’ll give you a clue.
You guess and I’ll tell you if it’s true.
I’m holding something that can turn the sky blue.
Yes, it’s a crayon, not a tube of glue!

76

-ail

Help! There’s something on my tail!
Wail, wail, wail, wail ...
Look! It’s just a little snail.
Now I’ll put it on my big nail!

77

94

-ue

-oat

Gary Goat, Gary Goat has a lovely new coat.
He takes his coat when he goes in a boat.
Watch out, Gary!
Oh! He can float.

Material

Unit

Rhyme

Story chant

Book 4C

81

-ay

On our way to the playground to play, play, play.
Oh no! It’s a rainy day.
Under this banana leaf, let us stay
Until the rain goes away.

82

-oy

Roy is a boy
With a robot toy.
When he is happy,
He jumps for joy.

83

-aw

Can you draw a dinosaur?
Big and scary with a very small claw.
Now please draw a bamboo straw
So the dinosaur can drink with its great big jaw.

84

-ight

Starry, starry night.
Dad holds me so tight.
Stars to the left, stars to the right.
Stars in the sky. Such a beautiful sight!

95

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

[Enrichment Year 3] Level 5
Material

Unit

Rhyme

Story chant

Book 5A

90

-ar

Vroom vroom in the car,
Vroom vroom fast and far.
Vroom vroom, watch out for the jar.
Vroom vroom, Vicky wins a star!

91

-orn

Jumping Gary falls on his horn.
It gets caught and he lands on the thorns.
Oh no! His jeans are torn.
It’s okay, though they look worn.

92

-irt

Put on a T-shirt,
Put on a skirt.
Take your dog for a walk.
Watch out for the dirt!

Material

Unit

Topic

Book 5B

96

silent k

Story chant
Knock! Knock! Come on in.
The birthday is about to begin.
Use a knife to cut the cake.
Some got on your knee; give it a shake.
Get the box and untie the knot.
Out jump friends – we love birthdays a lot!

97

Ouch, ouch! Dad hurts his wrist.
Lily wraps a bandage with a twist.
On the bandage she wants to write.
‘Wrong wrist,’ says Dad, ‘but it’s all right.’

98

96

silent w

silent b

Martin Monkey climbs the tree.
He shakes the crumbs off his thumb. Hee-hee, hee-hee.
They fall on Zack Zebra’s hair.
‘Now I have to use a comb. Please beware!’

Material

Unit

Sound

Story chant

Book 5C

102

-ing

103

-a

Rachel Raven cooks some bacon.
Rachel Raven wears her apron;
Eats her sandwich, yum, yum, yum;
Washes in the basin when she’s done.

104

-o

Romeo the robot wants to make a dish.
He opens the freezer and gets some fish.

Red Team is running fast, fast, fast.
Yanny Yak is jogging. She is last.
Red Team is winning the race today.
Animals are clapping, hip, hip, hooray!

Two fish are frozen. He can’t take them apart.
Bang! Bang! The board is broken. That’s not very smart.
105

-le

Little baby is crying in the middle of the night.
First I try a bottle; I hope it’s all right.
Then I try a rattle, but he still seems very sad.
Finally a cuddle, and he falls asleep. I’m glad!

97

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Appendices
Index of Sound Cards (Levels 1-6)

1

a

16

l

31

in

46

ock

61

sw

76

fl

91

wr

2

d

17

g

32

ick

47

bl

62

uck

77

ay

92

ist

3

m

18

w

33

qu

48

op

63

tr

78

pl

93

ite

4

b

19

et

34

y

49

ch

64

ake

79

ai

94

ong

5

ad

20

o

35

v

50

st

65

sn

80

oy

95

imb

6

t

21

j

36

an

51

ack

66

ine

81

oi

96

omb

7

h

22

og

37

z

52

cr

67

one

82

aw

97

umb

8

c

23

ot

38

x

53

est

68

ph

83

str

98

a*

9

f

24

u

39

ap

54

ink

69

ee

84

ight

99

pr

10 at

25

s

40

cl

55

dr

70

thr

85

ar

100 on

11 e

26

r

41

ig

56

th

71

ie

86

orn

101 o*

12 n

27

un

42

tw

57

ip

72

ue

87

irt

102 br

13 p

28

ug

43

ell

58

all

73

gl

88

sk

103 fr

14 k

29

i

44

sh

59

sm

74

ail

89

kn

104 le*

15 en

30

q

45

sp

60

ing

75

oat

90

ife

105 ud

*special sounds

98

Sight Word Poster (Levels 1-6)

a

do

in

on

this

about

down

is

one

those

across

eat

it

open

through

after

find

its

our

to

again

food

know

out

too

all

for

like

own

up

an

from

live

put

us

and

full

long

said

use

are

give

look

she

very

as

go

lots

so

want

at

good

me

some

was

away

had

more

soon

we

be

has

my

that

were

been

have

near

the

what

but

he

new

their

where

can

her

next

them

who

cold

here

not

then

will

come

him

now

there

with

could

his

of

these

you

did

how

off

they

your

99

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Index of Word Cards (Level 1)
Unit

Sound

No.

Word

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

1

a

1

alligator

6

t

36

turtle

2

act

37

tap

3

animals

38

table

4

ankle

39

take

5

ant

40

talk

6

apple

41

telephone

7

astronaut

42

touch

8

axe

43

two

9

dog

44

hippo

10

dig

45

hide

11

dance

46

hand

12

dinosaur

47

hat

13

dirty

48

heavy

14

doctor

49

hop

15

dolphin

50

hug

16

duck

51

hungry

17

monkey

52

cat

18

mop

53

cut

19

mat

54

cake

20

medicine

55

car

21

melt

56

caterpillar

22

mix

57

cold

23

muddy

58

cook

24

mum

59

cover

25

bee

60

fish

26

bake

61

fly

27

ball

62

fall

28

bear

63

family

29

big

64

finger

30

bite

65

flamingo

31

butterfly

66

fog

32

buy

67

full

33

bad

68

cat

34

dad

69

fat

35

mad

70

hat

2

3

4

5

100

d

m

b

-ad

7

8

9

10

h

c

f

-at

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

12

e

71

elephant

17

l

107

lion

72

empty

108

laugh

73

egg

109

lamp

74

elbow

110

library

75

elder

111

listen

76

enter

112

long

77

envelope

113

look

78

excellent

114

love

79

nightingale

115

goat

80

nod

116

go

81

new

117

garden

82

newspaper

118

girl

83

noisy

119

give

84

noodles

120

glue

85

nose

121

goldfish

86

nut

122

good

87

penguin

123

whale

88

paint

124

wash

89

panda

125

walk

90

pencil

126

water

91

pink

127

watermelon

92

point

128

wave

93

potato

129

window

94

push

130

windy

95

koala

131

get

96

kiss

132

net

97

kangaroo

133

pet

98

key

134

wet

99

kick

100

kind

101

kitchen

102

kite

103

hen

104

Ken

105

pen

106

ten

13

14

15

16

n

p

k

-en

18

19

20

g

w

-et

101

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Index of Word Cards (Level 2)
Unit

Sound

No.

Word

23

o

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

ox
offer
October
octopus
off
omelette
on
orange
jellyfish
jump
jacket
jam
jelly
jog
jug
juggle
dog
fog
jog
log
cot
dot
hot
pot
umbrellabird
untie
ugly
umbrella
uncle
under
undress
unhappy

24

25

j

-og

26

-ot

27

u

28

102

s

snail
sing
sad
sandcastle
sit

Unit

Sound

29

r

30

-un

31

-ug

33

i

34

q

35

-in

No.

Word

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

sock
soft
sunny

71
72
73

bin
tin
win

rabbit
run
rainy
read
rectangle
repair
rich
ride
bun
fun
run
sun
bug
hug
jug
mug
iguana
invite
igloo
ill
insect
inside
instruments
quail
quick
quack
queen
question
quiet
quilt

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

36

-ick

74
75

kick
lick

76
77
78

pick
quick
yak

79
80

yawn
yacht

81
82

yell
yellow

83
84
85

yoga
young
yo-yo

86
87

vulture
visit

88
89
90

valuable
van
vase

91
92

vegetables
vet

93
94

village
fan

95
96
97

man
pan
van

98
99

zebra
zip

100
101
102

zero
zigzag
zoo

103
104

zoom
fox

105
106

mix
box

107
108
109

fix
six
wax

37

38

39

40

41

y

v

-an

z

x

103

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Index of Word Cards (Level 3)
Unit

Sound

No.

Word

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

46

-ap

1

cap

61

-all

37

ball

2

clap

38

fall

3

gap

39

small

4

tap

40

wall

5

big

41

king

6

dig

42

ring

7

fig

43

sing

8

twig

44

swing

9

bell

45

cluck

10

shell

46

duck

11

spell

47

luck

12

yell

48

truck

13

block

14

clock

15

lock

16

sock

17

chop

18

hop

19

mop

20

stop

21

black

22

crack

23

pack

24

sack

25

best

26

chest

27

nest

28

rest

29

drink

30

pink

31

sink

32

think

33

chip

34

dip

35

lip

36

zip

47

48

49

53

54

55

56

60

104

-ig

-ell

-ock

-op

-ack

-est

-ink

-ip

62

63

-ing

-uck

Index of Word Cards (Level 4)
Unit

Sound

No.

Word

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

67

-ake

1

bake

82

-oy

36

boy

2

cake

37

joy

3

shake

38

Roy

4

snake

39

toy

5

line

40

claw

6

nine

41

draw

7

pine

42

jaw

8

vine

43

straw

9

bone

44

night

10

cone

45

right

11

phone

46

sight

12

stone

47

tight

13

bee

14

see

15

three

16

tree

17

lie

18

pie

19

tie

20

blue

21

clue

22

glue

23

true

24

nail

25

snail

26

tail

27

wail

28

boat

29

coat

30

float

31

goat

32

day

33

play

34

stay

35

way

68

69

73

74

75

76

77

81

-ine

-one

-ee

-ie

-ue

-ail

-oat

-ay

83

84

-aw

-ight

105

Oxford Story Phonics Teacher’s Guide (Levels 1-6)

Index of Word Cards (Level 5)
Unit

Sound

No.

Word

Unit

Sound

No.

Word

90

-ar

1

car

104

-o

32

broken

2

far

33

frozen

3

jar

34

open

4

star

35

robot

5

horn

36

bottle

6

thorn

37

cradle

7

torn

38

cuddle

8

worn

39

rattle

9

dirt

10

shirt

11

dirt

12

knee

13

knife

14

knock

15

knot

16

wrap

17

wrist

18

write

19

wrong

20

climb

21

comb

22

crumb

23

thumb

24

clapping

25

jogging

26

running

27

winning

28

apron

29

bacon

30

basin

31

raven

91

92

96

97

98

102

103

106

-orn

-irt

silent k

silent w

silent b

-ing

-a

105

-le



Teacher’s Guide  Levels  1-6
Oxford Story Phonics is a six-level phonics programme aiming to develop
young children’s phonics and literacy skills for a seamless transition to primary
English learning. The systematic course is developed upon two successful
Oxford children’s series: ELTons Award-winning Get Set, Go! Phonics and
bestselling Oxford Reading Tree. Young children are able to learn essential
reading and writing skills in a fun and engaging way.
This programme also prepares young children for a smooth progression to
Comprehension and Writing, a primary literacy programme developed by
Oxford University Press.

The Oxford Story Phonics series consists of:
Talking Student’s Books

Teacher’s Guide

Talking Reading Fun Worksheets

Follow-along PowerPoint decks

Talking Sound Cards

Placement and assessment tests

Talking Posters

Word Cards

Oxford Reading Pen

Printable crafts

Learn more

Oxford Reading Pen

PHONICS
ISBN 978-988-8678-63-1

1
www.oupchina.com.hk

9 789888 678631



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